The Nomadic Executive with Omar Mo - 
TNE049
Hosted by Omar Mo

How to Build a 6 Figure Business From Scratch as a Content Creator With Ryan Chimelis

Share: 

The single biggest reasons why most creative souls are never able to monetize their passions is because they lack proper business acumen. Our guest today brings together both worlds and helps creatives understand how to build a business around their passions.

We’re joined by Ryan of Chimelis Productions, a full funnel content production  agency based in Stuart, Florida. Ryan breaks down the exact business model and steps that creatives can use to start their own business and profit off of their passions. We also dive into Ryans goals of having 22 different income streams by the end of 2021. This episode has tons of applicable advice that you can start with today, so stay tuned.

Today's Guest

Ryan Chimelis

Ryan is a photographer & videographer at Chimelis Productions LLC. He's the founder of Chimelis productions, a video advertisement agency in Stuart Florida and has scaled his business to multiple 6-figures.

Ryan is an authority figure in building businesses from content creation. Find Ryan's work on his Instagram.

Show Notes:


06:00 - It's not just about putting out content, there needs to be a goal for the business

12:54 Social media strategy - building a funnel

18:00 Targeting high ticket clients

23:16 Focus on the things that you love doing and outsource everything you don't enjoy

30:01 Email marketing - lowest ovehead, highest conversion

38:02 Business Skeleton - Pipeline


Transcript

How to Build a 6 Figure Business From Scratch as a Content Creator With Ryan Chimelis | TNE049 TRANSCRIPT

Host: Omar Mo

Guest: Ryan Chimelis

 

Intro-

Hey, have you ever wondered about the origins of the expression starving artist? It was first mentioned over 250 years ago in the writings of Henry merger, who wrote at that time about four starving artists. He was romanticizing the idea of making art just for the sake of making art. Well, I'm here to tell you today that the starving artist is now a thing of the past.

The single biggest reason why most creative souls are never able to monetize their passions is simply because they lack proper business acumen. Our guest today brings together both worlds and helps creatives understand how to build a business around their passions. We're joined by Ryan of Chimelis Productions, a full funnel content production agency, based in Stuart, Florida, Ryan breaks down the exact business model and steps that creatives can use to start their own business and profit off their own passions.

We also dive into Ryan's goals of having 22 different income streams by the end of 2021. This episode has tons of applicable advice that you can start with today. So stay tuned.

 Before we get started here today, though, I like to give a special shout out as usual to a recent review that we got. Carlos123 says, absolutely incredible podcast.

Well, thank you, Carlos. He continues on saying the world is moving remote. And if you want to stay ahead of the game, give this a listen. Omar has on industry leaders entirely in the remote space, learn from the best listening to this podcast. Thanks for the kind words, Carlos. It really means a lot. And to you, my nomad fam, I'd like to remind you to please leave a rating or a review.

Every review helps this podcast become more visible to people who just may need that spark of inspiration to take the first leap. And of course, I'll be sure to give you a shout out on a future episode. Now, without further ado, here we go.

My name's Omar Mo and this is the nomadic executive. You're listening to the nomadic executive hosted by Omar from nomadables.com.

Join Omar as he sits down and speaks with leading online entrepreneurs, remote workers and digital nomads about everything from business strategy to travel and lifestyle design. Together, we're here to help you achieve a life of happiness, health, and freedom. And now here's your host, Omar Mo.

 

Omar:

All right Ryan. Welcome to the nomadic executive, man. I am happy having you on, finally. I met you through a mutual friend of mine who also has been on my podcast before. And when he told me about what you did and actually got to sit down and talk to you about it a little bit. I was really interested about how you started off with nearly nothing and now have made this business that you have. And not only that business alone, that's making well over six figures now, but also I think you're going to hit what 20 different multiple income stream sources?

 

Ryan:

We're hit, we're... The end game goal by the end of 2021 is 22 different streams of income.

 

Omar:

So you not only do just videography for these companies and these businesses that you got in contact with you do the whole full suite, the whole range of everything that they need from shooting the video to creating the content, to even running ads for it.

 

Ryan:

Correct. Yeah. We try to, we try to connect the content with as many marketing aspects as possible.

So something that I had to learn on really early was copy. So writing tons and tons of copy, and that's part of the script as well. It's just like every single social media aspect that we try to take advantage of, but it all derived from the content that we create. And we, if it's good content along with good marketing, it's kind of just like that exponential effect that just really good results when it comes to creating quality content along with the marketing aspects.

 

Omar:

So essentially you're offering your, your customers, your clients more value than the standard videographer. When you first started this agency, like, I don't know how long ago was it? Like, give me, give me a time.

 

Ryan:

The agency aspect, I started it maybe around six or seven months ago.

 

Omar:

So when you first started even like shooting any sort of video for any clients, did you start off just shooting the video or did you already know right from the beginning that, Hey, I'm going to offer all these services right away. And then you just started doing that or did you build off from shooting video first and then slowly add things in?

 

Ryan:

Actually I started off on just doing the video.

So when I was first really getting into the whole videography, cause I do video and photo for different companies when I was just starting the videography stuff, I was creating like gym edits for different gyms in the local bay area. And they would post it. Comments than usual, they got more engagement than usual, but that's, that's where it ended.

Nothing came out of it. They didn't get any more clients and I just wouldn't get hired again because I was not investment. I was an expense at that point. Right. So like I, that just creating content for the sake of making content and yeah, ever since that moment, I realized that there needed to be another aspect of this.

And that's where I kind of started getting into like the whole marketing world.

 

Omar:

That makes sense. You know, it's funny you say that because. I remember watching, or I remember actually talking to a couple of social media managers that all they really do is that they post content and they don't do it in a way where they're doing some sort of call to actions or doing any sort of revenue-driving activities.

Instead they just post the content. And it's usually the companies that have like a massive budget and money to just kind of spend and not really care about just because they want to look a little bit more official for Instagram or all these other places that'll tend to buy those services. And they'll never stick with it long-term because like you said, at the end of the day, it is an expense, it's not any sort of revenue. Right? So how long did you, how long did it take you personally to realize that like, was it just from seeing the same pattern over and over? Hey, you're not getting more work or when did it, when did you click?

 

Ryan:

It really clicked when there was this one client, I can't say who it was, but it was a pretty decent sized client. They were definitely doing over around 2 million a year. And I was making a video for them, for their like some type of event that they were  having. The main goal of the video was to introduce a lot of key players in their company.

And I made the entire video and I didn't necessarily know what the goal was. And the shoot was absolutely horrific. I did not enjoy it. It was extremely complicated because there was no actual goals surrounding the content that I was making. So after that specific experience, I started researching some of the top digital agencies like raindrop media or chamber media, two amazing production agencies.

And I started realizing that their videos are not that good production wise, like they're, they're fun videos, but it's not like anything cinematic or things like that. The key thing are the scripts and the pacing and the fact that they're actually goal oriented. So when I did that one shoot for that one client where they, I didn't know the goal and it was a very confusing, confusing shoot, it made me realize that, okay, I can't keep doing this. And then I started noticing the pattern with my other clients where they would hire me for one edit. Like every six months or something like that. And I'll try to pitch them on something like, okay, I can make your social media content for like every single month so you have something to post every day, but I can never explain why that was important because honestly, I didn't know at the time it how to actually get them clients with real content. So that one experience with that once shoot where I couldn't find the goal was like the beginning of me realizing that there needs to be another aspect in all of this.

 

Omar:

Hmm. I see what you're saying. That's, it's interesting really that so many people that I think are hung up on social media and just try to fill it up, you know, without really getting anything from it, you know, everyone's screaming from the top of their lungs saying, Oh yes, social media is a way to like build a business. Like if you want eyeballs on your business, build social media, put more content out. And business owners, especially ones that have never been digital before, automatically think that, Hey, if I put more content out, then I'll get more business.

 

Ryan:

It is, Oh my gosh,

 

Omar:

You see it all the time then?

 

Ryan:

Yeah, yeah, exactly. Something that I've seen a lot because everyone and this is kind of like a taboo kind of thing because obviously he's very successful.

I always look at Gary Vee, I think he's an excellent marketer. If you look at his YouTube analytics, they are not good. He's posting several times a day on YouTube and it's really become like a quantity over quality kind of thing, where it's almost become white noise because I've worked with companies that are posting like twice a day, every single day, stories so many times a day, and they don't see any results because it's not following a specific strategy.

It's just content for the sake of making content. And honestly,

 

Omar:

I want to talk about that Gary Vee thing for a second, before we move on there.

 

Ryan:

Definitely go for it.

 

Omar:

Yes. 100% I believe that it's becoming white noise, but there is one thing. And I think it's only specific to YouTube, to be honest about why it's working in that sense.

And it's simple, right? YouTube has SEO behind it. So like, let's say I went on Google and I got, I bought a hundred domains. Right. And on each domain I made like a hundred pages each. And for each page, I made each page specifically SEO for a specific question that someone was searching up on Google to find an answer for it.

Right? What I think Gary Vee is doing, and obviously like those pages will rank over time in six months, eight months or whatever. And someone will search a question and naturally maybe hop onto, or find one of your 100,000 pages on the internet there that answers a specific question. So I think Gary Vee is trying to do, yeah his analytics maybe horrible, but what I think he's trying to do is he's trying to rank for specific questions.

And the only reason I think this is because I know, and it's just a theory by the way, it might be wrong and I'm wrong a lot. That's one thing for sure about life, right? But from what I've seen is just, whenever I try to search for a specific entrepreneurial question on YouTube, for some reason, Gary Vee's  YouTube video headline always pops up saying, Oh, with my exact question right in the headline, and then saying, watch this at the end of it.

 

Ryan:

In that aspect, it makes a lot of sense, actually. And I've heard, I've heard that before from a couple of different people in like different videos on YouTube and in that aspect, it does work. When I see other businesses basing off of that strategy, I see it fail horribly. So like, if like I work with, I used to not so much now because I moved on to bigger clients, but I used to work with a lot of coffee shops. If they try to implement that Gary Vee aspect posting so much content daily, it really takes a toll on like their aspect, because nobody's asking too many questions about coffee shops.

Everyone just wants a good cup of coffee, right? So like in that aspect, it really, it really does work if he's trying to like the corner of the market for specific specific questions. So yeah, it actually does make a lot of sense.

 

Omar:

I see 100% what you're saying. So in your, in your regard, like in your line of work, how have you seen, or how have you been, I guess this is the golden question here, right?

How have you been able to drive revenue for these small businesses from the content that you create aside from paid advertisement?

 

Ryan:

So aside from paid advertisement, we have basically a social media strategy that the main goal is to get them to direct message the company itself, whoever I'm working with, because then that conversation can start.

And when that conversation starts, we have someone , if it's a high ticket product or a high ticket service for different companies, we have an actual person reaching out to them, having a conversation with the goal of booking a meeting. If it's different businesses like coffee shops, we have an automated responder that will send them a link where they could plug in their email.

Now we continue to email market them with different deals to get them into the shop. 

 

Omar:

Brilliant. So you're not acting like these, and this is a very important lesson here, by the way, to my audience, you're not acting like the standard Instagram influencer that puts a link in their bio wanting to get your audience to buy some things simply because you're posting content on social media. You've built a funnel.

 

Ryan:

A hundred percent.

 

Omar:

In that funnel, your content engages them in, brings them in maybe it's entertainment purposes. Maybe it's some sort of value knowledgeable content. Then with that, maybe in the caption, I would guess that you tell them to DM you?

 

Ryan:

Most of the time we have it in, like, if it's a video, we have it actually in the video.

So Instagram actually rewards certain accounts when they use different features in the actual page. So a lot of times, so a lot of times what we do, we have the carousel where it has like multiple multiple videos. And on the first video we have basically the main posts. On the second video, it's if you want like a certain deal. Like I like to use the coffee shop example because it's very applicable to different businesses. We will, if it's a new client, they can put in their email and if it's a brand new email, their first deal would be a free cup of coffee and that gets them into the shop.

So like, that's something extremely simple that everyone can implement with so many different businesses with a lot of these low ticket businesses, but high lifetime value. It's really just like give them something in advance. Get that conversation started.

 

Omar:

Brilliant. Brilliant. So, so you use social media as a simple conversation starting lead gen machine and you have an automatic responder that gets somebody get something free, which makes them want to come into the shop. And once it gets them foot traffic, if their coffee's good and their atmosphere's good, boom. You have a dedicated customer.

Absolutely brilliant. And when you talk about this, I've seen this own strategy used like with me. There's a local coffee shop that I go to down the street. It's called Dulcetto Delatte. Shout out to them.

Great people, good family. I haven't actually been there in a few months, but that's only because I've been moving around a lot in Houston. So they're the local coffee shop though. So when I went in there and it was like literally the first day of 2020 I went in there and I had a conversation with them and we all got along and I was like, you know what?

They make good coffee. And I like these people, I'm going to keep coming back and I kept coming back for a few weeks. And then I disappeared because I had to move around. So lo and behold, two, three weeks later, cause he got my number from a simple transaction. They sent me texts saying, Hey, we miss you come by for a free coffee.

 

Ryan:

Like that.

 

Omar:

Brought me back in and there was, and there I was again, buying coffee for the next five or six weeks in a row again. So.

 

Ryan:

A lot of the times it's not that complicated. I see people wanting to complicate it so much and they just, a lot of times they don't know where to get started. Something as simple as that, like keeping a phone number and starting a text message sequence that could drive like a reoccurring revenue through the roof. Just that little, little thing.

 

Omar:

Yeah, absolutely. So in the same regard then, you've done, you're talking about low ticket items here and local businesses. Have you done any sort of high ticket client work?

 

Ryan:

Yeah, we've done a high ticket client work that actually ranges from around 3000 to 25,000. And our main thing is to get them on the meeting.

We'll never close them over the DMs. It's just not realistic. And my company itself, because we have people that manage those accounts. We actually don't want to be the one to make the sale because that's really not our responsibility. We have the option for us to make the sale, but that's going to cost a lot more money.

So most of the time, we're the ones booking the meetings and basically a lead generation source. And when it comes down to that, our main thing is that whoever we're working with, the content that we create for them is such high value. And then the meeting that they book isn't going to be incredibly high promised value.

And we kind of give them like little hints here and there on exactly what we would talk about in the meeting. And yeah, it's kind of just, we need to make sure that the content that we're providing for those high ticket products is top tier stuff, because it doesn't need to be the best content in the world.

It just needs to be a little bit better than your competition.

 

Omar:

Okay. So in that, so does that mean you're making these high value pieces of content? Doing some sort of thing where they, where you get the clients to DM you or the potential customer to DM you, or is it that you're DM-ing the potential customer?

 

Ryan:

So this is actually interesting. When it comes to really high ticket products, like we did something for one of the biggest lawn manufacturers in the US. And what we did a lot was target the marketing directors for really big companies around the United States. And we figured out that there were specific like pages that those people would follow. And we started going through them running ads to those specific niches.

And if you get one client, because we're not charging for that kind of stuff, we're not charging a $25,000 retainer. So if we get them one client it's worth it in their eyes. So we're mainly going after marketing directors , CEOs of different companies, obviously the decision makers in figuring out doing tons and tons of market research, trying to figure out where they hang out and then we'll attack either way, wherever they're hanging out, because we don't, we're not chefs making content for Instagram.

We do Instagram, Facebook, and YouTube, and most of the time with those bigger companies that don't have a social media presence, their CEO or CFO, are on Facebook. That's what we've seen the most. So we're either going through straight direct messages through there, or they find us through the ads that we run for that company.

 

Omar:

Interesting. Does it, does organic content ever work too for these big high ticket companies?

 

Ryan:

With the high ticket stuff, organic content is definitely harder. It has happened in the past, but it's 100% harder. And we try not to rely on that. Just because it's so much easier with like, just like a $1,500 ad spend for something like that to grow their audience.

And when it comes to the high ticket kind of stuff, we try to base a lot of what we do off of by reality. So we look at exactly what's going viral in that specific niche and try to base our content off of that. And knowing us, we're going to make a higher quality piece of content. So there's a chance or bigger chance of it actually gaining some traction.

And once it gains a little bit of traction, we usually get I want to say around like five to nine kind of leads per proposed for the high ticket stuff. Most of the time, those leads aren't necessarily the highest quality, but that first relationship step usually ends up coming into a deal usually around like 40% of the time.

 

Omar:

Makes sense. That's cool, man. I'm going to have to really check out some of your high quality content. Where can people find that in that sense? Where can they find your high-quality content?

 

Ryan:

Well, actually. So that kind of leads into something that we're going to talk about later on, I don't post any of my content for a specific reason. This year, I am going to be posting every single piece of content, but I used to post a lot of stuff on my Instagram and that almost destroyed my business because a lot of the stuff that I do is corporate stuff. So I did a homepage commercial for a, I think it was, it was a plastic surgery office. And after that plastic surgery office, I did three or four videos for them, something like that. And I posted all of them.

And then I started going after a niche that I genuinely enjoyed, which was gyms. I did not get a single client for months in the gym niche because I posted that plastic surgery video and it didn't add up. They didn't want someone who was filming a lot of stuff for plastic surgeons to film stuff for gyms, because then it wasn't like the same kind of vibe.

It wasn't the same energy and it was harder for people to distinguish the fact that I can make content for different niches.

 

Omar:

So that's why I guess niching down really is important too then in that case.

 

Ryan:

Yeah. So, and that's another thing I decided early on that I was not going to niche down. There's tons and tons of benefits with niching down.

And it's much, much harder to kind of be like an open source kind of thing to really work with anyone who's a high quality, a high quality client. The reason I'm not niching down is because I want to build this agency absolutely massive. Like pulling it, pulling in like seven figures a month eventually.

And I don't think that's too realistic if I stick to one niche and also I want to enjoy my work. So I want to work with like a lot of different companies, a lot of different creative companies. It's going to be harder. It's going to take a lot more time, but in the long run, I think it's going to be worth it.

 

Omar:

I've seen some people. Go like start really niche down and then kind of spread their wings a little bit whenever they want.

 

Ryan:

Yeah, 100%. That's definitely how I started. My main clients were gyms for quite some time.

 

Omar:

And now you spread your wings a little bit and dabbling in other things. I think in a, in a sense, that'll stop you from becoming too bored too right? I mean,

 

Ryan:

100%. Yeah.

 

Omar:

Because you keep making the same sort of content for gyms over and over again.

 

Ryan:

Yeah because like the system works. Once you get the system down for a specific niche, it's kind of just reiterating that. So I always get excited when I start doing lead generation for a different niche because it's basically a whole new field. It's a whole new game. I need to start from scratch and building those systems for them for a completely different topic that I know nothing about.

 

Omar:

You enjoy it.

 

Ryan:

Oh yeah. It's very much enjoyable.

 

Omar:

I feel like the same way about my business too. I never considered myself an organized person, but for some reason, building those systems around for lead gen for a new business or a new niche, or just are just enjoyable concepts. I think that's, that's really the true essence of business, right?

 

Ryan:

Yeah. It's fun. If you think it's fun, then you're going to stick with it long-term and that's a very big thing.

 

Omar:

That is massive, man. That's a huge lesson I feel a lot of people need to really take in, you know, because if you're listening to my podcast right now and I touch both travel and business and business has just never been your thing, don't try to just start a business. And if you do start a business, don't do any of the business, the things that you don't enjoy, outsource all of it and just focus on the things that you do love doing. Right?

Most people in my audience, Ryan, they're aspiring, people that want to travel and work. That's, that's a majority of my audience. And with that comes two sides, right? There's the people that really want to work and have the luxury of being able to travel. And there's the people that really want to travel and have the luxury of being able to work while they travel, you know, and that's a key differentiation and the people in the, the ladder, they tend to start a business for the sake of starting a business, but are unhappy the entire way through. And for those people, I always tell them, and I've gotten in touch with a few of my audience members here about that.

I've gotten in touch with them and I've always suggested, Hey, like, If you really want to work and travel, there's so many other ways in just starting a business, you can start freelancing and then seeing what you enjoy in that sense, and then double down on that and let someone else make the business around it.

You know, there's so many different thoughts you can take, you know. Including you, you like what you're doing right now is a very creative business. You're taking your passion for videography and photography, and I've seen your photographs on your Instagram. They're absolutely fantastic by the way.

 

Ryan:

Appreciate that.

 

Omar:

You've taken your love for that and you've built a business around it and that's awesome. Yeah.

 

Ryan:

Something that you were just talking about how your audience, some of them want to be able to travel with the luxury of working. Some of them want to be able to work with the luxury of travel. With my specific business and our mutual friend, I talked about this a lot because he is basically 100% remote, obviously with a production company, you need to be in a certain location.

And I've gone back and forth because obviously I, my end goal game for this production agency is for it to run on itself so that I can make actual films. That's like a long-term goal of mine to actually make films that I could put in theaters, throw on Netflix, Hulu, all those streaming platforms and actually enjoying the journey, I think requires me to disconnect myself from the business to a certain aspect.

So later down the road, I am eventually going to outsource this to people that I end up training so that I can have that luxury to be really anywhere I want. And I think a lot of people, they get hooked on like working on like laptop, laptop, life. They get hooked on like, I want to be able to go anywhere and then they completely bypass certain ideas that might work for them.

Like a production agency. I know a lot of people that want to take photos and videos and stuff for business to specific. And they're not, because they want to find some type of online business that they could work anywhere where this business is definitely. Yeah. This business, it is different, but it is possible.

It just takes a little bit longer time. And I know it's something that I'll enjoy, whether I'm working from remote or actual location, but it is possible to turn really any business into a remote location. If you just build it up big enough, in my opinion.

 

Omar:

Yeah no, that's, that's very true. And that's any business, by the way.

I mean, you could own a freaking shoe store and eventually work your way out of it and have someone else be the manager and et cetera. And you just kind of look at the figures from your laptop in a different country. So, absolutely true. But are you the one, in your business, going out and still shooting all the photos and videos?

 

Ryan:

The majority of the time ,yes. Because I like building that relationship and something that I do a lot is study psychology. Basically how to have conversations with certain people, how to get in touch with the right people. And right now I don't stress anyone to build up those relationships except for me. So those bigger jobs, I always, 100% take. I 100% make time for it.

The smaller ones? Most of the time I outsource it. But if I'm getting paid like $10,000 to shoot a commercial for somebody I'm 100% going to be the one shooting it just because I trust myself the most.

 

Omar:

To make those relationships and keep ones.

 

Ryan:

Yeah. Yeah. And it's not like, great content is great content.

I'm always the one overseeing scripts and copywriting. Just because I want everything to be the high, highest quality content. I trust a few videographers that are on my team. But right now I like to have at least oversee of every aspect that goes on so that I can approve everything.

 

Omar:

They always say hiring yourself superstars is the hardest part of your business because creating those relationships and things are intangible things that you can't just train somebody overnight know you can make an SOP about how to do human psychology.

 

Ryan:

Definitely, you cannot.

 

Omar:

That's cool then, man.  While we're on this topic of you making these relationships with people, how do you actually do your outreach for these local businesses in the first place? Is it done in person? Is it done by an email or some other source?

 

Ryan:

Lately, it's been over zoom just because everything going on in the world But if I can I meet them in person, that's just how it goes because I live in Stuart, Florida right now. I know almost like every single business owner in Stuart, Florida, just because I love the place.

I love meeting the people. I love being involved with the community. And if it's a, if it's a business in my area or near my area, I would love to go meet them just because I. If they're a business owner, then we can relate on at least one aspect of things. And then I know about that business. I know the people there and it's more relationships that usually more stuff, more gigs and stuff, but when it comes to exactly where my meetings are taking place right now, most of the time it's over zoom and that's caused a little bit of a little bit of discretion just because I'm not entirely, like, it's not my preferred method. I would much rather be in person, but I understand that zoom is definitely like, you can have quite a few meetings a day if you're just doing it over video chat.

So I've kind of been training myself, figuring out exactly how to present myself online when it comes to those chats, because something that I study a lot is body language, and I basically know how to read people now. And it's kind of hard to read someone through a video chat.

 

Omar:

All you see is their head.

 

Ryan:

Exactly. Exactly. So it's kind of been something that I've been working on recently to kind of, I don't know, portray myself correctly the way I want to with just a screen.

 

Omar:

Hmm. That makes sense. That makes total sense. Could you also add on how you get these meetings in the first place?

 

Ryan:

Like how most of my meetings are they're gotten through cold outreach through email.

 

Omar:

So email.

 

Ryan:

Yeah. Yeah. Email marketing 100% I think is by far the lowest overhead method, but also highest converting method.

And if you do it correctly then it is, it will 100% work for nearly any business. If you do it incorrectly, it will 100% discourage you to never do it again, which is what the boat that I was in for quite some time. But after I really started practicing it, I actually found a method that worked out extremely well for me.

And right now I'm booking like, well, actually this new year, I'm going after 10 different niches. So that actually starts the 15th, I think. But before I was like on a 100 email send out with a followup sequence. I was booking maybe around like nine to 12 meetings on , a hundred percent in like a 100 email list.

 

Omar:

That's good. That's really great.

 

Ryan:

Those numbers were like really, really good. And it's, I think it's more about the prospecting rather than conversions, because like I'd rather take a person who can prospect really well and than like a sales guy. So it's, I think it's more about like exactly who I'm going after than how I'm going after them, if that makes sense.

 

Omar:

Targeted approaches rather than doing a shotgun. I mean, it's pretty much the difference between shotgun versus.

 

Ryan:

Exactly. Yeah. And with email marketing, I could target specific people so like with the email marketing, if I'm going after bigger companies, I'm always going after the marketing director.

 

Omar:

Yeah. Cause they're decision makers.

 

Ryan:

Absolutely. Absolutely. When it comes to the content creation, they're the 100% the decision makers. If I go after the CEO, most of the time, my email would go straight to trash.

 

Omar:

Yep. That's a good point. And in fact, I think that's a very key point that I can actually utilize in my own business.

 

Ryan:

A hundred percent.

 

Omar:

So I will keep that in mind. I, but there's like a certain variability too. Right. So if the business is not big enough to the point where they can even afford having a marketing director or a CMO or anything similar to that then yeah, CEO is probably your best bet.

 

Ryan:

Yeah. When it comes to the smaller companies, they usually have a single email, like, info @ whatever business it is. And most of the time they will 100% see the email if it goes to that, if they only have one.

 

Omar:

Hmm. They're very targeted. I'm guessing they're personalized, you know, just from knowing our mutual friend and guessing you really

 

Ryan:

Oh I've picked his brain a ton. Yes.

 

Omar:

Yeah. I've taken, I'm guessing you've taken a very targeted approach and it's, it's that line that you said like two minutes ago that, you're gonna hate cold email if you don't do it right. And you're going to love it, if you actually do it the right way. And you're right about that 100%, because there's no other medium besides maybe LinkedIn, depending on the business that you're in, but even then not as good as cold email and that can get you as many prospects and meetings as cold email can, right?

Because, and I've tested many platforms with these cold outreach methods. And with Instagram, you're limited to like, especially with the new algorithm, you're limited to maybe 20 DMs a day.

 

Ryan:

Yeah, before you get action blocked. Yeah.

 

Omar:

Exactly. With Facebook, you're going into their trash or their spam inbox before you even make it to their real inbox, if you're not their friend. With LinkedIn, it's I think that's a little bit better. It's a little bit more natural. People are always networking on LinkedIn. So that's why I speak better about LinkedIn. But TikTok, TikTok doesn't even have a messenger practically... So I mean what, there is one app that I have found incredible for cold traffic, but not so much for local agencies, but more for at least American, maybe even worldwide agencies, Clubhouse. So it's a new app. Have you heard of this app?

 

Ryan:

I have not heard of it. Please tell me.

 

Omar:

All right. It's insane the marketing strategy behind this app. I love talking about this. I'm going to go on a little rant here.

 

Ryan:

Go for it. Let me go take some notes.

 

Omar:

Clubhouse. New app, the new social media app.

I know TikTok is fairly new so it almost feels weird there's already another social media app. But clubhouse is going to be the next big thing. There's celebrities on there already. Grant Cardone. Tai Lopez, all these different, big marketers, big names. Kevin Hart. Like a bunch of big names on there.

The way they're marketing the app is that it's exclusive. The only way someone can get in is if they know somebody else that already has it, and they're able to invite that person. And each person only gets one invite to send. Unless they start engaging a lot more on the app and then maybe you get another invite after month to send out.

So very exclusive in that way. If you go on Google and search clubhouse app, there'll be like headlines or web pages that say things like the exclusive social media app for celebrities, like they're really built it up that way. That's how they marketed it. Now is it really that exclusive? No. I mean, at this point, everyone is sucking each other off for an invite, or it seems like, but if you really wanted to, you can go on like a Facebook group and spend 20 bucks for an invite yourself and there's way or ways around it.

So the greatest thing about that, the way it works is that you'll have a list of rooms you can pick from and in those rooms will be anywhere from five to like 500 people. And it is going to, it's going to be like a convention style. So you have a panel of speakers that the moment that you enter the room, you can hear them speak and then you'll have the audience and audience members can raise their hand and the host will get a notification and they can raise their hand and then they can get invited to go up there and speak.

So imagine being in a room where Grant Cardone, Tai Lopez are speaking and they ask questions to the audience and say, Hey, come up and speak. You can raise your hand in the audience and go speak to them about that for free.

 

Ryan:

Dude that's, that's the next level of stuff. I like, I like the invitation aspect of it because that's, it makes them so much more invested when they first get on.

 

Omar:

Absolutely. I've recently I just got on it this past week, like maybe six days ago, but I'm already super invested simply because I have a podcast and it goes with the audio medium of what I do, but I've already been in rooms where people have sold thousand dollar courses to their audience members, simply because they were curious about social media.

Like that's how crazy it is in terms of cold outreach and the prospects that you can get from that are warm automatically right after the intro in their room.

 

Ryan:

I'm definitely going to do some research on that. That sounds pretty damn cool.

 

Omar:

Do it. Do it. I think it's a, it's an amazing, amazing lead gen tool moving forward, especially come 2021 better than TikTok or any other platform out there.

 

Ryan:

Especially with like the climate that we're in right now. The fact that we aren't necessarily allowed to travel wherever we want to go. That's huge.

 

Omar:

Absolutely. Yeah. Who knows? It might be some use to your business as well if you're able to do some sort of local runs and.

 

Ryan:

I already know that it's going to be useful to my business. Absolutely. I'm 100% going to get on it one way or another.

 

Omar:

Sweet. Check it out and give me a shout whenever you're on.

 

Ryan:

Absolutely.

 

Omar:

Great. So let's move forward here. We've talked a lot of different aspects of your business. So I want to summarize before I move on to the next key point here. Could you just give me a basic workflow, almost like a pipeline of your funnel that you do from just for my audience members here that want like a skeleton of what an actual business looks like?  Just your pipeline from the beginning. The cold outreach and starting with email marketing and ending to actually getting the sale and doing service delivery.

 

Ryan:

ool. So we'll go through the example of, let's say, let's say a commercial gym that has like hundreds of locations around the US. I will first do a cold email outreach to the marketing director of that chain gym. If they book a meeting, they book a meeting. Awesome. On that meeting, we'll try to close them for one of our deals for a gym, it would be a social media contract. So creating their social media content. As we create the social media content through a range of photos and videos, the main goal of that content is to build up a relationship strong enough where they will actually DM the actual page. The reason we want them to DM us, because like you said before, if you DM 20 people, you'll get action blocked, and then you can't DM any more people. It's unlimited the amount of people that can DM you. So we try to base that content on a psychological aspect where they feel comfortable enough to reach out to us on that page.

And then, if it's a chain gym, we will try to get their email by giving them some type of offer, like a free week or a free month where they would, can actually plug in an email. Then we have the email for life to continue email marketing. But the main purpose of that offer is to get them through the doors because when we get them through the doors, then the business that we're working with can win them over.

But all of this derives from the quality content that we create for those clients to actually build up that relationship online because the online market is incredibly, incredibly saturated right now. We need to find a way to stand out and we try to do that with the copywriting that we put in our scripts.

 

Omar:

Boom, great funnel. And even your own advantage for your business. One final thing here before we move on, is there a way that you have to track how much traffic you're getting organically from  how many people actually walk in through those doors?

 

Ryan:

Well, what we like to do is, our main tracking source is through the email.

So like, if we're trying to track the people that we would get for this so-and-so chain gym, we like to keep track of how many people we're actually outreaching to. And then see how many people actually signing up onto that email list. That's our main thing. And then we'll like, depending on how certain weeks go or certain months go, usually every week we kind of change the message, kind of try to optimize it.

But when it comes to like, people actually converting from the content that we make to the direct messages. It's kind of hard to track that because there is no set limit to the amount of people that will see our posts. Because it's not like we're running ads to a group of 100,000. If the post goes a little bit viral, then it goes a little bit viral, much more people are going to see it.

So it's a little bit difficult, which is why we really need to get creative with the marketing aspect of things, because it's not something that you can optimize to the fullest potential just because it's not like an ad source.

 

Omar:

Makes sense. And I'm sure it's things that you'll slowly figure out as time goes on as well.

 

Ryan:

Yes. 100%. We kind of have a pretty straightforward method for specific niches, but like I said, every time we start a new niche, we have to kind of start from scratch and build that optimization from the ground up.

 

Omar:

Makes sense. It's like always starting a new, a new business almost every time you do that.

 

Ryan:

Basically, basically, yeah.

 

Omar:

Cool man. Well, thank you for those key points of advice. I'm sure it's going to be very useful to my audience.

 

Ryan:

Absolutely glad.

 

Omar:

Right. So moving forward now, how has your 2021 looking?

 

Ryan:

2021 is looking like it's going to be the most productive year probably of my entire life.

Even for the future. I think this year is going to be the absolute, I don't know the biggest growth year I'm ever going to have in my life. No matter how big my career gets. Like we talked about a little bit before, but I'm planning on building around 22 streams of income this year ranging from a lot of different aspects.

But I'm trying to optimize it in a way that it's not like I'm starting 22 different businesses. Some of it's passive, some of it is actual, like just the regular grind. But it should be, I'm very excited for it. I'm very excited for it.

 

Omar:

Yeah. What are some like key things that are really going to add into that growth that you're going to experience this year?

 

Ryan:

Well, I'm going all in on YouTube. So for, I like to use this example with my production agencies, something that we all also do is real estate. We love shooting real estate videos because it's very simple. I just love checking out these massive houses. That's just something that I love to do. And when I make those videos, it just goes to the client and nowhere else.

And then I started doing some research on the real estate niche on YouTube and how much money the real estate niche on YouTube is making, it is an insane amount. So, or a, let's say a $5 million mansion. I'm making a video for them. I'll probably charge around 17, $1,700. That's cool and all. It doesn't take a lot of time and getting paid a decent amount, sure.

 I've seen videos that are, honestly, not the best in the world, but it displays that the house is nice on YouTube making around $25,000 per video, which is absolutely insane. So why wouldn't I post it? So I'm not doing any extra work and it's creating a completely separate revenue stream. It's those kinds of examples that I'm really trying to take advantage of so that I'm doing, in some aspects, I'm doing the same amount of work, but making around four times the money.

 

Omar:

Is that from simply video views?

 

Ryan:

That is just from ad spend. I mean yeah.

 

Omar:

People must love watching $5 million mansions on YouTube.

 

Ryan:

It's insane. So like, it's cool. Like when you started doing research on the YouTube analytics, the average spend for like a thousand views, it's called a CPM.

Yeah. People usually like the creator usually gets paid around five to $7 and that is with YouTube overall. In the real estate niche, I'm sure it's a little bit higher than that. I've seen it higher, like around like $12, but let's just say a five to seven.

 

Omar:

$12 CPMs for real estate?

 

Ryan:

I know a couple of people that have hundred dollars CPMs.

 

Omar:

For their videos?

 

Ryan:

Yeah. It's not in the real estate niche, in the financial niche, which is another thing that I'm starting, but I've seen the small creators have like a hundred to $150 CPMs

 

Omar:

On YouTube?

 

Ryan:

On YouTube. Yes.

 

Omar:

I'm surprised. Podcasts CPMs range around 25 to 50. So I'm surprised about that.

 

Ryan:

Dude. It is insane. I've only seen two people with triple digit CPMs, but absolutely nuts.

 

Omar:

Just out of my own curiosity. And I know this is a little bit left in, but what causes such a high CPM or what, what gives them such a high CPM return?

 

Ryan:

So the videos that I've seen and have triple digit CPMs, it is for a specific product that has a huge marketing budget. So they, so like the company that owns the product are the only ones running ads on that single video. And they can charge, they could spend like tons of money on it too, for them to be the only ones on that video, because the video is about like, let's say, let's say like a online marketing course.

That person who owns the online marketing course is obviously going to want to run their ads on that. If they spend top dollar, they're going to be the only ones running their ads on that, in that specific situation, the CPM goes through the absolute roof.

 

Omar:

Crazy.

 

Ryan:

Yeah, absolutely.

 

Omar:

You just really worked out your own ad spend model right there.

 

Ryan:

It's insane what they're up to. Absolutely insane.

 

Omar:

Yeah. I'm guessing you're going to want to automate that to eventually, like, you're not going to want to be doing the uploading and all that.

 

Ryan:

Yeah. Yeah, definitely. I'm going to automate that at one point, but honestly, the uploading it'll take me like 20 minutes, something like that because I'm already creating the video or one of my one of my video guys are creating the video for the real estate or real estate agent, whoever we're working with.

So it was honestly not that much work.

 

Omar:

Okay. Yeah, there's the SEO aspect and all that too. Thumbnails and all that, but actually I know a good. I know a good video editing slash thumbnail making website that gives you returns on videos in like two days for relatively cheap price. So if you, if you want to just use that once in a while, if you ever need it in a pinch, I'll send it to you, send you the link.

 

Ryan:

Yeah, definitely. I hit you up about it, for sure.

 

Omar:

Cool. Even though they kind of our competitors.

 

Ryan:

Yeah. Something it's something that we always like to do. So we've actually worked with YouTubers in the past to kind of grow their online presence and with YouTube specifically, something that we like to do, and it's a little bit out of the box. We'd like to go on different, like do some research on different podcasts, forums, and online chats and build up a relationship in those niches. So like, let's say a financial niche. We're working with a financial Youtuber who's trying to get their audience growing. We will do research on exactly the most popular forums online, the most popular online chats related to that niche, start building up a relationship through that and then throw the video in there.

If people know us, we throw the video in there and then that will be the jumpstart of actually growing that YouTube channel. And most of the time we have like a list of like, let's say a hundred forums and we'll get around, like, let's say 40,000 views out of that. Those 40,000 views. It's enough to like start building up that virality over time.

 

Omar:

That is a good strategy. Jump-starting the virality and forums. I see that done on Reddit quite a bit, actually.

 

Ryan:

Yeah. Yes. 100%. Yeah. Reddit is one of those online chats that we like to try to utilize.

 

Omar:

Nice. Nice. You're throwing gold out here, Ryan.

 

Ryan:

Yeah.

 

Omar:

Okay, cool. So YouTube is one of your all-in income sources this year of 2021.

How about the other ones from the other 21 that are left? What are some other key ones that, and also give me some active ones, give me some passive ones too.

 

Ryan:

Sure. Let me bring up my doc here. All right. So one thing that I'm going to do, it's a little bit passive, so it's going to take some work.

I live in a house in Florida and I'm the only one living in it. It's only 11 round, like a 2000 square foot house. I'm the only one living in it. It is way too big for me. I'm turning the entire house into a photo studio. And one of the spare bedrooms is going to be a recording studio. You have the spare bedroom, it's going to be a like a dressing room kind of thing, and gear vault.

And I'm going to start renting out the house because I thought about this. I want to make the most money as fast as possible. That's kind of where I'm at because the goal for 2021 is to make a million dollars. So I might need to make some sacrifices. So I talked to a few people and they're like, Oh, why don't you rent out the master bedroom?

I'm like, okay. Yeah, sure. I could probably make an extra $750 a month with that. Like Airbnb or like finding a roommate, something like that. Like, yeah. Okay. I don't really want to live with anybody. So instead of renting out my master bedroom for 750 a month. Why don't I just rent out the photo studio, recording studio for $500 a day.

So that's one thing.

 

Omar:

More revenue too.

 

Ryan:

Exactly. Yeah. So that, and I don't need to live with anybody. Which I think is very important for me. So that's something that I'm going to start doing. I'm going to start a coaching program to go really into depth. So like all the strategies that I've been throwing out here.

They're all systemized with real practices and real market research. So I'm going to start a coaching program eventually. Bring clients into that. That's probably going to happen within the next month or so to do really show them how to start basically any online presence and the marketing aspect of basically any business that they want to go after.

 

Omar:

I know you don't, or you don't want to niche down with your main cashflow business, but why not niche down with your coaching business?

 

Ryan:

The coaching is going to be for actual creators for like videographers and photographers. Yeah. But we would need to show them how to do market research and marketing for really any business that they want to go after.

 

Omar:

I see that's what differentiates you, Ryan. And this is for all my creators that are listening to this podcast episode. You not only create, but you also handle the business side. Yep. And most creators fail to do that.

So that's, you're going to have a good demand for what you're going to be teaching there because you can, you're going to help people, creative souls, turn what they love into an actual business.

 

Ryan:

Yeah. That's kinda like the main roadblock for a lot of creatives. Cause I know tons of people that are better than me at creating, but they're not better than me at something like storytelling. They're not better than me at marketing aspects or strategies and things like that.

So you can't sell a $10,000 commercial to a business and without telling them exactly how much money do they think it's going to make. So it's little things like that, that I would love to teach people because once they get like the core aspects and the strategies, it's almost endless on what they could do.

Back to the streams, different streams of income. Something else I'm gonna do is I'm going to create, at the end of the year, I'm going to create a photo book full of my favorite shots. And after this main year, I'm really starting, I'm really gonna focus on building up my audience. So I'm only going to do the photo book off of organic outreach.

So that's going to be another small stream. So my company is called the greater collective, and I want that to be a name that every creator knows eventually. So along with that, I'm going to be starting a merch line. I'm starting four different YouTube channels. The channels are obviously the real estate that we talked about.

Me personally, I love cooking. So cooking is going to be one of those YouTube channels. One of them is going to be a financial channel because the financial niche gets paid a ton on YouTube. And the fourth one is going to be my personal brand channel.

 

Omar:

Okay. Well, one thing I've noticed before you, just a minute there, one thing I've noticed, not only has it happened to you but many many people around me is that when they try to take on like a bunch of different projects at the same time that either a burn themselves out or  just won't have enough time to really give everything, their all. So what is your strategy to kind of manage the time and be able to launch all these different products, launch all these different products this year and all these different channels of income sources and do them well enough to where they're actually generating revenue for you?

 

Ryan:

So it kind of all leads back to certain systems. I, for me, I think the hardest part of this is going to be obviously the actual filming aspect of things.

So let's say for the cooking show, that's very random in my line of work. Like why the hell would I start a cooking show? It's something that I'm passionate about. I need to try to make it as easy as possible for me to do. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to have a permanent setup, permanent cameras set up in my kitchen, where I'm already cooking daily. Why not film it. So it's going to be a permanent camera set up. All I need to do is press record on three different cameras and then edit it down.

That will probably take like an hour or so, and really I can outsource it. So that's going to be another thing that's off my plate. When it comes to the real estate, I'm not doing any extra work except uploading the video.

The financial stuff, the main aspect, because it doesn't need to really be a cinematic video. The main aspect of it is going to be the script. So when it comes to that kind of stuff, it really comes down to my script systems on exactly how I'm going to catch people's attention, what value I'm going to give. And basically how long the video is going to be. There's a lot of different aspects in that.

And really it's going to come to trial and error, a lot of testing. So I have basically a starting point right now on exactly how I'm going to do all of these different things. And then over the next six months, I'm going to optimize it all. So I don't necessarily have a full answer.

 

Omar:

That makes sense. I mean, having all the answers right off the bat. Twenty-two income streams, would be kind of nuts. Unless you're a human machine, but one thing I did notice there is that all your, these other paths or these income streams are kind of branched off from things that you're already doing.

 

Ryan:

A hundred percent.

 

Omar:

You know, it's not like you're, you're doing your main cashflow business. And then all of a sudden you decided to sell used cars on the site. You know, they're branched off. There's a synergy between everything. It's like your main cash flow businesses and who you are, it's like the main tree in the rainforest. And then as the tree gets older and it drops seeds into the ground, there's some trees that grow around it and some roots that grow deeper into the ground.

And it's almost like an ecosystem of all these income streams that are building off from your main cashflow business that are all things that you enjoy. Rather than you try and start four or five different hustles that don't have any sort of synergy. And a lot of entrepreneurs make this mistake, especially in the beginning.

And I don't know if you can relate here, but I definitely did too. Was that, when I first started out, I was trying, I was like, Oh, that's shiny. This is shiny. Like, I want to try that, Oh, you know what? This is a fantastic opportunity. Do you have any.

 

Ryan:

Every single course ad that you see, you want it? I went through that phase 100%.

 

Omar:

Exactly. And then you finally settle on the one thing that you enjoyed. Right? 

 

Ryan:

Like my thing is 100%. If I was going to put it into one aspect, it's constant creation. Everything. Everything is constant creation.

 

Omar:

And that's what you enjoy?

 

Ryan:

Yes.

 

Omar:

Did it take a little bit of time for you to realize that?

 

Ryan:

It took me. I mean, not necessarily, because I was taking photos in high school. So I knew that I loved creating like certain content. I really just didn't know how to make money from it. And a lot of these income streams that I have, I would say around 90% of them is content creation. I think there's actually only two of them that are aren't content creation, actually one.

But it was hard to figure out exactly how I was going to build a business off of it. And the thing is right now, where I'm at is comfortable for a content creator, but I don't want to stop at six figures. I don't want to stop at seven figures. And it's yeah. So I'm trying to figure out exactly how to scale as big as possible in this plan that I have right here seems to be the best way because every single income stream that I have on here, bounces off of another one, it's all intertwined into this really big web where like, if one pops off, then all of them are gonna pop off.

Because a lot of it is really connected through the like an actual audience built so.

 

Omar:

Serious, like brainstorming session, just kind of sitting down and thinking.

 

Ryan:

The doc that I sent you is like maybe 10% of my entire plan. I have all of this webbed out, like in like a lot of different documents, it took quite some time.

But I, I pretty much all of these are connected. Every single one of them.

 

Omar:

Yeah. That's, that's awesome, man. That's really good to hear. And that's something common that you see amongst all the great entrepreneurs as well. They have like anywhere from 20 to a hundred different income streams coming in, especially those guys that you see with like the monthly income reports on their sites.

They will be like, Oh yeah, I got this much money from this and this much money from this. And it'd be like 50 different things. And that's what gets them so wealthy, you know, not just, I mean, cashflow business. Yeah. Good ambitions, man. That's, that's really awesome that you got this going and, and I only see good things coming for you by the end of 2021 and 2022 and everything ahead of that. So.

 

Ryan:

I appreciate that.

 

Omar:

Absolutely. So a final few points here to, I guess, close the podcast episode off here. Number one, and this is something that I thought of earlier, but I didn't get a chance to say until now. All the education that you did for business wise, I know you're going to do your own coaching program, but if there are any creators that are listening to this episode right now, if they wanted to just start learning today, but these different business aspects and what to do what, how can they learn the way that you did?

 

Ryan:

Honestly, YouTube. I built my entire business based off of two things, YouTube and books. I actually had access to around, I want to say around $250,000 worth of courses. A lot of it was my own money. A lot of it was wasted money and all of the content that I saw on those courses were on YouTube for free.

So it's really figuring out how you want to do things and then asking the right questions. Like we were talking about the Gary V thing, asking the right questions and then finding them on a free source on YouTube 100%, everything that like, I want to talk about, like, cause you were mentioning the coaching that I got planned, everything that I want to talk about in the coaching, I am making sure that the answer is not on YouTube. If the answer is on YouTube, I will send them the link in the coaching program. Because if it's free, it's free. I don't want to, I only want to tell people the things that I needed to figure out through trial and error that I do not see online already, but if they're first starting off and they want to continue to learn, definitely YouTube all the way.

 

Omar:

Good. That's something I definitely preach as well. That, and if I were you, as in my listener, I would pay for mentoring or coaching over a course, simply because you ask someone there with you, that's done it, been through it, and there's so much more you can learn in a five minute span from that person and a 50 hour course.

 

Ryan:

There was never a course that I fully went through that I didn't end up having more questions than answers. If I could talk to that person, then I could get those answers, those questions answered, and it might've ended up in a good situation, but I haven't found that course yet. It's only through coaching.

 

Omar:

Very rare. It's the only people that are fully living what they do instead of trying to make their income sources, the actual courses that they're selling. And when you mentioned the books, what kind of books did you read? Were there any ones that you kind of liked or that stood out?

 

Ryan:

Obviously, I, there were a lot of books that were more philosophical than anything. I'll give you, I'll give a recommendation for one philosophical book and then one, a straight cut book that had that I've utilized in my business at time.

 

Omar:

Sure. Why Philosophical before you tell me? Why a philosophical book? What about a philosophical book really helped you learn?

 

Ryan:

Me personally, I had a lot of anxiety growing up where like, I even had like seizures because of how much anxiety I was having. It was anxiety induced, and it stopped me from doing anything, literally anything. I couldn't eat lunch with regular with just like the kids in the class.

I ate lunch in the bathroom. Like, I, it was really bad for a little bit and I need to change. It sounds so cheesy because it's an, every single, like, inspirational video. But changing your mindset is like huge. And it's, it is, I will appreciate till the day I die and I know it's become such white noise, but it is huge.

 

Omar:

I a hundred percent attest to that. So. My anxiety, my anxiety was never that bad, but I do did deal with depression a lot when I was a kid.

 

Ryan:

Everyone always does. And like, there's a lot of answers out there where if you just like open up your mind a little bit, it could help, it could help. 

But back to the book thing philosophical wise, A book that I really liked was, and it's a really mainstream book.A lot of people have read it already, subtle art of not giving a fuck. Very good book. A lot of people read it and then do not practice the actual lessons taught in it. And that was me for awhile. And then I started practicing the actual lessons taught in it and it changed everything completely. Like if you read that book, take notes, take notes on the certain lessons that Mark teaches.By far will change the game. 

And then if I was going to give a marketing book that really changed the game for me, I'll give two, one is copywriting secrets. It is huge. It is huge. It's basically the blueprint for starting the marketing aspect of things here. Wait one sec.So this is marketing secrets. As you can see, all of these sticky notes are different things that I've learned through this. Huge game changer, huge game changer.

 And then another book I would start off with. There's a lot of better ones, but it's a good to start off with this one is how to win friends and influence people.Just so that you could begin to learn a little bit about psychology and how to speak with people because business is, for me personally, is all about relationships. And if you don't know how to build relationships and you don't know how to speak to people, you're going to have a harder time than usual.

So I honestly think it's incredibly important to learn how to speak to people, learn how to get a feeling from people. I think, I think it's huge to learn how to portray yourself the way you want, because I want people to think of me, like as a happy outgoing guy where they don't need to feel nervous about what they say to me sometimes, but I might not always come off that way.

So I want to learn exactly how to come off that way to other people. And that's something that how to win friends and influence people taught me a little bit.

 

Omar:

All three of those are really good book choices. Even though I haven't read copywriting secrets. I have heard raving reviews about it. So it's definitely already on my own list.

Really good book choices. Thank you for that, Ryan.

 

Ryan:

Of course.

 

Omar:

Cool. One final question now, and this is a question that I ask nearly everybody that comes on this and that is, and I know you haven't traveled much, but you are, you do have a business that's fairly remote and it is soon, maybe in the next year or two, you're going to be fully remote.

But this journey that you've been going through ever since you were a creative up till now, your views changed a little bit about life. I mean, not only just in the business, but you have to fight anxiety, you overcame that. You learned about the business side of being a creative. You built your own business to six figures.

I mean, you have all these different things that you've done. You have employees, you know, so through that entire journey from the beginning to where you are now, what would you say is the biggest lesson that you've learned?

 

Ryan:

I would say the biggest lesson that I've learned.

 

Omar:

Actually before you even answer that, I want to rephrase that.

Pick the biggest lesson that you learned, that if you had a chance to put on a billboard on the highway for the entire world to see what would it be?

 

Ryan:

Honestly, I would say. Huh. That's a, that's an interesting question because I've learned so many, there's so many different things that I have that have had like really big aspects of like, I guess what you would call a success and things like that. But if I was gonna, if I was going to tell someone, I'm not sure if this would be considered lesson, but if I was going to tell someone to do something, it would be, do something difficult every single day.

That's what I would put up on the billboard, because that will translate into every aspect of your life, because I'm sure you've heard about cold showers before. Cold showers, like you could talk about the health benefits all day long. For me, if I'm taking a cold shower is because I know it's something I don't want to do.

And if I force myself to do it, like other things that are hard to do will become easier. And like those little micro challenges that you go through. For an entire year can build up to you knocking on that business door saying, and start pitching. Something that I have anxiety about was like cold calling.

I'm still working on that. I don't technically make cold calls because I have other outreaches, but cold calling is something that some businesses will do amazing with. If you have anxiety about cold calling, maybe not start off with cold calling, but start off talking to a stranger at a coffee shop.

And then start off talking to a person that you're attracted to and then start building it up until conversations don't bother you anymore.

 

Omar:

It's weird cause like I think those first two can be even harder than actually doing cold calling.

 

Ryan:

For me, it was the exact opposite. I couldn't do cold calling if my life depended on it, but I could talk to a pretty girl at a coffee shop all day long.

It was really, it was really strange, but for me, it was doing those little hard things every single day. I'm pretty sure there's a book. I forget the name exactly. But the Navy seal talks about making your bed. It's the same lesson. So many people are talking about the same lesson in different aspects.

And it's really is just doing hard things every single day, so that you can train your brain to really think that nothing is hard. And then you could basically go and do anything.

 

Omar:

Have you ever heard of like the winner effect?

 

Ryan:

The winner effect?

 

Omar:

Winner.

 

Ryan:

I have not, please tell me.

 

Omar:

It sounds very similar to what you're saying actually. It's if you rack up small wins throughout the day, And I've heard people do things like maybe play a game of chess against the easiest level computer in the morning, or like a video game or something that's like set on the easiest mode and just get a little win that way, or maybe wake up and actually stick to your morning routine or whatever.

It just like small little wins throughout the day. Especially like the really small ones in the morning. They can snowball into bigger wins later on. And if you carry that consistently days and days and days you can have just like this feedback loop of like winning and it'll, as you do it, it will actually boost your testosterone, but not only that it'll just help you win more because I'm sure you've heard of people. I'm sure you've experienced this yourself. That if you win over and over, you keep winning, but if you lose it, you tend to lose a lot more.

 

Ryan:

Yes, 100%.

 

Omar:

So that winner effect is kind of similar to what you're saying. It's just that do those things that are difficult or get some small wins in the morning and just have it snowball to where you're able to do more difficult things and win more.

 

Ryan:

Yes, I, 100% agree with that. It's basically kind of, it kind of derives from the same core lesson. It makes so much sense, so much sense.

 

Omar:

Hmm. Cool. That is a great lesson to end the podcast episode on, thank you so much for coming on today, Ryan.

 

Ryan:

Thank you so much for having me. It was a fun time.

 

Omar:

Good time, man. Great value. Take it easy.

 

Ryan:

See you.

 

Outro-

You made it to the end of the episode, nomad fam. Remember to leave a rating or review your feedback helps take this podcast to the next level. It's funny how things are sometimes. Your review could start a butterfly effect and literally end up changing someone else's life for the better.

So keep that in mind. The guests are about to get crazy these upcoming months, including yes, Pat Flynn. I appreciate every single one of you, the nomad fam community. It's been a great ride so far, and we're only getting started. So make sure to hit that subscribe button and stay along for the ride. One final thing.

If you made it this far, I want you to shoot me an email omarmodigital@gmail.com. I would love to sit down and connect with you with a one-on-one. I want to know who you are, what you do, your story, everything about you, because if you've made it this far, you've probably been listening for a while. So yeah, shoot me an email. Anyways, thanks for listening. Speak soon.

Thanks for tuning in to the nomadic executive. If you enjoyed this episode, take a moment to leave a rating or review. Your feedback helps us reach others who need a spark of inspiration. See you next time.

 

 

 

 

 


Download the FREE Online Entrepreneur Guide

  • Learn how to MARKET yourself and create a brand identity from scratch.
  • Simple methods to find and attract your niche audience and ideal CUSTOMER.
  • Full checklist on building a PRODUCT around your audience that sells itself.
Download the Guide