The Nomadic Executive with Omar Mo - 
TNE045
Hosted by Omar Mo

How to Create 100 Pieces of Content a Day That Generates Leads and Sales With Beck Power

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Today’s episode is all about content creation, content repurposing, and utilizing content to increase your exposure, opportunity, and customers in your online business.

We’re joined by Beck Power, founder of Power Creative Media which aims to serve as a content repurposing academy and agency. I sit down with Beck and really dive into the different types of content you can make for your brand, how to repurpose that content, and then distribute it in a way which helps your brand grow.

If you’re active on any of the social platforms, which you should be, this episode is a must-listen.

Today's Guest

Beck Power

Beck Power is a digital nomad thought leader, entrepreneur, and co-founder of several successful business ventures she runs from her base in Bangkok, Thailand. She’s known for her no nonsense approach and entrepreneurial mindset hacks. Beck specializes in bootstrapping products and businesses that are profitable quickly and can be started with minimal capital. She has been featured on Entrepreneur.com, Digital Trends, Product Hunt, NY Magazine, Fast Business and Yahoo.com.

Transcript

How to Create 100 Pieces of Content a Day That Generates Leads and Sales with Beck Power Transcript | TNE045

Host: Omar Mo

Guest: Beck Power

Intro-

Content, content, content. Content is king.  I'm sure you've heard that phrase many times. If you are involved in any sort of digital entrepreneurial endeavor, and I'm guessing you are if you're listening to this, content is a key to gaining more exposure, more opportunity, and ultimately more customers. There are some brands out there that are posting up to a hundred times a day across seven main social media platforms.

 

Now you're probably thinking, how the hell am I supposed to post a hundred times a day? Fear not. Today's episode aims to make that 10 times easier for you. We're joined by Beck Power, founder of Power Creative Media, which aims to serve as a content repurposing academy and agency. I sit down with Beck and really dive into the different types of content you can make for your brand, how to repurpose that content, and then distribute it in a way which helps your brand grow. Now, if you’re active on any of the social platforms out there, which you should be, this episode is a must-listen.

 

Before we get started, I'd like to give a special shout out to a review we got recently.  Cat&ham says, Omar brings the top digital nomad guests with a variety of backgrounds and businesses. This is a must-listen if you're looking for inspiration and the possibilities that are out there. Thank you for the kind words Cat&ham and to you, my nomad fan, I'd like to remind you to please leave a rating or a review. Every review helps this podcast become more visible to people who just may need that spark of inspiration to take the first leap.

 

And of course, I'll be sure to give you a shout out on a future episode. Now without further ado, here we go.

 

You're listening to The Nomadic Executive hosted by Omar from nomadables.com. Join Omar as he sits down and speaks with leading online entrepreneurs, remote workers and digital nomads about everything from business strategy to travel and lifestyle design. Together, we're here to help you achieve a life of happiness, health, and freedom. And now here's your host, Omar Mo.

 

Omar:

We have Beck power.  How are you Beck?

 

Beck:

Hi Omar. Um, I'm doing really well. Thanks. Thanks for having me.

 

Omar:

Of course. Thanks for coming on. So from my audience here, and we just spoke a little bit before I hit record, but go ahead and tell my audience what you do.

 

Beck:

Yeah. So, um, I own a content creation agency, um, out of Toronto, Canada, which you can tell that I'm not Canadian, I’m from New Zealand, but I'm here in Toronto running this agency.

 

And we also have an Academy as well. Um, I really enjoy helping people to create content and I find that most people have kind of throw the spaghetti at the wall and see what sticks, um, strategy for content. And so I really liked figuring out with them. What's the best strategy for them so that they don't feel overwhelmed.

 

Uh, and, and also figuring out what's effective. Cause not all content is effective.

 

Omar:

Right, right. And some sorts of content, I guess, work with some types of organizations better than other types?

 

Beck:

Definitely. Definitely. And it's really important to meet your, your audience wherever they're at. Some people don't know who you are. Some people do know who you are. There's two very different types of content.

 

Omar:

Interesting. So the type of content that you throw off, for example, when you first started business would be completely different than if you're a veteran in it.

 

Beck:

Yeah. Yeah. Well, definitely for me. And I think for most people who have their own business, you have to try things and see what works at the beginning. And you are it's, it is kind of like a, just a bit of a mess where you figure things out because you're trying to do everything. And content creation is not usually very high on people's list of things to do, but I think we undervalue it a lot and, uh, I'm excited to have this conversation about it.

 

Omar:

Awesome. So why don't we get started then how you got your start into content creation and your passion of like really starting your own content creation business.

 

Beck:

Yeah, definitely. So I became a nomad, um, eight, eight-ish years ago. Uh, and I got my start online, um, with an, I had an SEO company in New Zealand.

 

Um, and that was a lot of fun and figuring out things 2010. Um, and I was just trying to figure out like how to do it, like how to do SEO or how do you do content marketing? We were doing, um, all content marketing. We were doing all like blogs because in those days, that's how you did it. And in 2012, the penguin update hit Google and we were totally screwed.

 

Omar:

Everything got super complex.

 

Beck:

All we'd done was content. Um, and we hadn't even done that much cause you didn't need to right? We did like six posts for somebody and suddenly they're on the first page of Google. It was amazing, but we didn't have long before that was, uh, that stopped working. And so. Um, I decided that I would, you know, I'd learned how to do websites in that time. I learned a ton about WordPress, so I just thought I'd go nomadic. And I moved to Thailand and I, I started to do all my own stuff, but it was really hit and miss, and I hadn't really decided what I wanted to do. So it was that thing that we kind of do. I think a lot of nomads do this.

 

Omar:

Before you continue here and I lose my train of thought, going back to you having your own SEO company, and this was your own SEO company, is that right?

 

Beck:

As a co-founder, yeah.

 

Omar:

When the penguin update hit, did that like completely ruin your business?

 

Beck:

Yeah, we were totally screwed.

 

Omar:

Just went under because you couldn't work around it.

 

Beck:

We, um, we had the strategy, there was three of us that founded it. And so it was a little bit top heavy of the company. And so we were, um, we were scrambling to figure out a way to do it and actually at that time, and it was in 2012 I said, let's do niche sites. Cause we were, we had been, you know, doing blogs for people. And then I was like, this isn't going to work.

 

Let's just get these sites to the top of Google and then rent them out to people. Um, and that was an awesome idea and I kind of wish I would've stuck with it honestly, because that would be making so much money by now. But, um, but yeah, we, we let it go. And when we went, we parted ways and I decided to go to Thailand.

 

Omar:

All right. Well, I mean, it's a great first business to start off with, I guess?

 

Beck:

Yeah. And it gave me a ton of, um, experience and knowledge and ideas and that's how I was literally how I started online. I had a furniture business before that. I started when I was 26, importing, um, furniture from China to New Zealand

 

Omar:

You’ve always been entrepreneurial.

 

Beck:

Yeah. Yep. I have, before that I did sales. So, um, I've always been entrepreneurial. I've always been looking for new opportunities. I think in the past, what I lacked a lot of was confidence to really stick with an idea and see it through. Um, and I feel like that's…

 

Omar:

Perfectionism.

 

Beck:

Yeah, exactly. Perfectionism and also kind of permission for me. I really, I know people mentioned this sometimes and I feel it was real for me is just, um, Oh, can I actually do this? Like if someone like is someone going to stop me, how, what are the rules? I just, I just felt like I didn't have, um, the kahunas to pull anything off really.

 

And so I kind of flailed around for a few years. Doing people's websites, creating content, helping with blogs. And then, um, yeah, really started to come into my own maybe three or four years ago when I started e-com. I've really tried everything, man. I have a huge, you know, um, knowledge of the online space…

 

Omar:

You were in this game way sooner than most people were.

 

Beck:

Yeah. And we did, um, we did so well. I had a business partner doing some, uh, doing a drop shipping store from China back in the day four or five.

 

Omar:

This was in Thailand?

 

Beck:

Uh, yep. Yep. I was in Thailand for that. Um, so, but I was on and off. I was based in Thailand, but you know how it is everywhere, but I did have an apartment in Thailand.

 

Um, and so we did e-com and a lot of that was about how to get traffic. How do you convert traffic? It was a lot of those types of lessons. I think we probably created less content at that time, but we still had to create some because we did a course. We did the store and we did a course. Uh, and so I learned about making courses and all that type of stuff.

 

Omar:

Would you promote that course with that content or not doing that much content?

 

Beck:

We did. Um, we did ads, the guy who was, who I worked with was really good at ads. That was his whole thing. And so he just ran all that stuff and I managed the actual course content. Um, yeah. You know, inside the course or the clients or the people, the Facebook group, all that type of stuff is what I did for that.

 

Um, Yeah. And so what I've noticed, what I noticed, um, recently was like all of these things that I've done. I mean, I've promoted a lot of info products over the last three years. I learned a lot about that and, and like, all this stuff has in common as content, right. Um, even if you're running ads to the content, even if your content isn't there, that's still content.

 

Um, so yeah, just really got, realized how passionate I was about all of that stuff at the end of last year when I was, um, working on some info products. And then decided…

 

Omar:

Where do you think that is? Because it has that creativity aspect that really fosters inside of you whenever you make the content.

 

Beck:

Yeah, I I'm passionate about, um, self-expression that sort of thing. That's really important to me. And, um, Uh, I grew up without a lot of self-expression, I had quite a sheltered and, um, restrictive childhood. And so…

 

Omar:

Strict parents, maybe?

 

Beck:

Yeah, and religious background. And, and since then, since that, um, since I kind of left that lifestyle, I realized how important it is to figure out who you are and to have something to say in the world.

 

Omar:

Absolutely

 

Beck:

And so, uh, I, um, that's what I'm, I'm really focused on helping people to, to express themselves, using their voice, using content and stop trying to beat, beating themselves up for not writing blogs. If you're a video person, don't try to make yourself write blogs. You know what I mean? Like there's no point in beating yourself up, embrace the thing that you love.

 

Omar:

Absolutely. Yeah. I preach that all the time. So you were in Thailand, you started e-commerce, what happened after that?

 

Beck:

Well, um, what happened after that? I was traveling around, Oh, I decided to leave Thailand and go to Mexico. And I started a brand called queer hustle, which was for queer women entrepreneurs. I did a conference. It was my first live event, um, in LA in 2018. And, um, I just sold that last month, that brand.

 

Omar:

Congrats on the exit.

 

Beck:

Thanks. Yeah. Um, that was really, that was a really fun thing that I felt like, you know, a lot of these things I try, it's just not, I just feel, I didn't feel passionate about it after a while. I just knew that I'm glad it existed and that's why I created it.

 

And I found someone who was really passionate about that. Um, so I was able to move on from that. And at the same time, I had started this content re-purposing brand last year or the beginning of this year. Uh, and I was able to just focus on that it was taken off and I couldn't ride, it was like riding two horses at the same time. I couldn't do it. Um, and I just really felt strongly that I needed to focus on one thing. And ironically man, like my whole, this whole time I've been hearing, you know, focus on one thing, one thing, one thing. And I was like, Oh, it's just so fun to try all these different things. And I've got all these different skills. I could do whatever. And I was always stressed.

Um, and I just realized like, Holy crap, if I just do this, this is the, my golden ticket is just like carrying on with one thing. And if I would've kept on doing those niche sites in 2012, like, this would be a different conversation, right? Yeah. I feel like boom.

 

But, um, but yeah, now I've learned that I feel like that's what one of the biggest lessons over the last two years for me is like, find something that you're really passionate about and don't just go for the shiny object like this. I can see a path now forward, and it's really exciting.

 

Omar:

I feel like content creation really simplifies, uh, the reason why you enjoy all of those businesses that you made in between when you left your first business until the one you're in now.

 

So in a way, like you made a full circle, but you realize what your real passion was, was the root of what all those businesses were in the first place. So yeah, it was a good learning experience.

 

Beck:

Oh, it always is. I'm very happy with, obviously we always wish we would've learned these lessons faster because we would have made more progress. But at the end of the day, I was just, I'm so grateful for those lessons.

 

Omar:

So tell me how you got started with this current content creation business that you have. What were the steps that you took to, I guess, make that vision a reality?

 

Beck:

Yeah, I love it. So, um, I always always start a business by selling something first. I never ever have never gone to debt. I've never tried. I've never had investment or anything like that. I always validate the idea by getting someone's credit card and I say yes to them. And then I figured out how to do it. I've done that at least 10 times, you know, with all these things that I've done. Granted, those businesses didn't work out because I was like, well, this isn't for me. But, um, as with this business, it was the same, it was like someone, um, someone was asking about content repurposing and I had seen the Gary Vaynerchuk deck where he explains about how it works.

 

Omar:

Yeah. 64 pyramid thing. I refer back to that one a lot.

 

Beck:

It’s super cool. And I just loved like the, um, I mean, I, I love his brand and, and, um, how flexible he is with things and how like, um, like nimble. And so I was like, this is going to be, I can do this. The instructions are all here. Look, I'm just going to do it. And listen, there was some, there were some, uh, it was a learning curve for sure. And, um, I did it myself the first, uh, the first few times, and I figured out, you know what software is a good and what is, there's lots of different. Um, It's a workflow. There's lots of different steps. You know, it's really difficult to, uh, to do all of these things because people want, they content repurpose into all types of different things. GIFs, memes, quote cards, videos, audiograms, and it's tough to figure out if you're just starting at the beginning, how to build that workflow.

 

But, um, I was, I actually stranded in Mexico for a lot of this year. And so I spent a lot of time inside by myself, um, working on the workflow of this business. And there wasn't anything else to do, man. Like the beach was closed. It was like, I'm just gonna stay here.

 

Omar:

So from that first, I guess, iteration of your workflow up to now, how much time have you really saved?

 

Beck:

How much have I saved?

 

Omar:

Yeah, per I guess, piece of content or rather per taking a piece of content and repurposing it?

 

Beck:

Well, now I have a team, so I built up my team when I was in Mexico. And my goal was by the time I leave Mexico, I'm not going to be doing any of this delivery stuff anymore. And I did it. I did it two weeks before I left Mexico.

I had a team. We did, they would handle everything even now. Like, all I do is, um, sales calls and like marketing. I said, all I want to do is sales and marketing because I really love that. I love solving problems. I love sales and marketing and every time there's a problem or some, some kind of bottleneck or something in the agency, I jumped back in, I try to solve it or I hire somebody and then we figure out how to add it to the workflow. And then I get out again and I get back into sales and marketing.

 

Omar:

Interesting. How'd you get your first client for that? Um, this is the question I like asking really often because getting that first initial client for any business and validating that idea, the first time is always one of those problems that you kind of have to solve and find a unique solution for because every business has client acquisition done in a different way.

 

Beck:

Yeah. Well, um, what I was doing last year was booking, helping people book speaking gigs. And, um, then when the COVID started to become a thing, I pivoted into podcasting and then someone who I was doing podcasting stuff for was talking about content. And I said, Oh, I could do that. And, um, you know, I said, listen, just give me 500 bucks.

Let me see if I can do it. Um, and they said yes. And, um, I, I've never had a problem asking for money for things to try, because if I fail, I'll just give it back to them. Um, and I, then they know that there's no risk or anything like that. Cause, and it's, it's like I'm being paid just to learn. And if I enjoy the process or if I can see, I mean, I don't enjoy the process of repurposing content. Like don't get me wrong. I don't enjoy it. I'm not a details person. I, it was terrible, but I hired someone really quick to replace me at one of the stages. And then I had someone else for the other one. And then I had someone else in my head suddenly like six people on my team doing all this different stuff.

 

Omar:

Where'd you find the hires?

 

Beck:

Um, Facebook groups. Mostly.

 

Omar:

I hear that one a lot.

 

Beck:

Yeah. Yeah. And, uh, and, and I I've got a good, I guess I go with my gut on a lot of, a lot of things, so. I all the people on my team are… They're cool, man. They're really cool people. We get along great. We have like kind of parties every week in the, on a zoom cause we're on different time zones and stuff. So I would just check in with each other and it's kind of, I don't want to say it's like a family or whatever, but it's, um, it's a good environment to be in and I want to, I want to help them. We have bonuses and stuff like that. Cause I really want to make sure that they are taken care of. I chat to them one-on-one I think that's really important. I didn't want to just kind of like disappear. Um, but yeah, they're all, they're all invested in the thing. It's not like they just do tasks and then leave. They're all invested in what we're doing and they understand the bigger picture of the business.

 

 

Omar:

That's good. Do you keep like a pretty, I guess, uh, what's the word I'm looking for? Pretty constant contact with your employees, or is it like a weekly basis? Like the challenge of having virtual employees or employees that are kind of spread all over the world is being able to manage that all via zoom and like, uh, Online time card, software type things, you know, and it's much different than seeing somebody in person and having some employees coming to the office and running it from there. So what's, I guess your strategy to make it run like a well-oiled machine.

 

Beck:

Yeah, we were doing calls once a week, but the time zone was pretty tough for my project manager. Um, she was getting up at 6:00 AM on Monday mornings and was like, this is not for me. And I was like, okay, cool. Like, let's figure it out. Um, we weren't really… The meetings that we were having weren't that important? Uh, They were important, but you could do the same thing on Slack. Like we didn't need to have a call. So we've tried a few different things and now we spend a lot of time posting gifs in Slack. Um, so that's one thing. And then, yeah, like I said, every week or two, we get together either on a call or we're just having to all be online at the same time. And then we, you know, update on what's happening.

 

I think one of the key things actually about my stuff is that very early on, I wasn't like, listen, I know that you need work. But I'm really interested to hear what you love doing. Like, what's your favorite thing? And they're like, Oh, I love video editing. I really love this.

 

And then I'm like, cool. We could, I could do with that. Like, let's do it. Because it, even though there are other things I needed done, it's so important to me that someone is excited about what they’re doing.

 

Omar:

Right. Very important.

 

Beck:

And so I don't have anyone who's like, ughhh, I have to do this thing. Every single one of them is like, excited about what they're up to because I hired them to do the thing that they told me that they loved out of a whole range of jobs, so…

 

Omar:

Incredibly important stuff. Do you have like some sort of workflow where they just like, you ask them to do something and then just get you that work via Slack or something like that? And there isn't really that much communication between you and the employee. It's rather like you've built the processes around getting something done and you just watch it unfold.

 

Beck:

Yeah. We've got SOPs. Um, we had our SOPs for the workflow. I actually mixed it up recently because I think you always should be looking at where's the bottleneck. And I always want to be removing bottlenecks and we had one, it just became easier to do it a different way. And so I've restructured a little bit, um, with like inside, you know, the delivery of the stuff inside the agency versus the marketing of the agency actually flipped it around.

 

Um, so now a lot of the people are doing, um, the marketing. A lot of the people who were inside were doing now during the marketing stuff and vice versa, we have SOPs for all the things. And when we don't, we, we create them almost immediately after we've done a couple of some, you know, um, thing. Like I have a particular type of video, three types of video that I do.

 

And there's SOP is for each one of those videos. So they don't need to ask me these videos go out. Uh, well, they're about to start going out every day. And they know every time I send them 10 videos, they know exactly what to do with them. I don’t need to…

 

Omar:

So you trained them really well.

 

Beck:

Yeah. I'm not big on like, um, If there's like a lot of stuff coming in, all like a lot of questions and a lot of detailed stuff, I'm like, I just decide yourself.

 

Omar:

Yeah. The small details don’t really matter that much. It's good. Because like talking to you, I can tell you're really entrepreneurial, big picture type person who really likes overseeing everything and kind of seeing that everything's working the way you want it to work, but not really micromanaging. Or, uh, getting on people's cases too much, you know, as long as that final product looks the way you want kind of wanted it to, and then you're happy. And it's awesome to see that because you're able, you were able to build this agency like just last year you started and you built it with teammates hire and you, and you've turned it into this machine and just under a year.

And so that's props to you. Like that's pretty awesome.

 

Beck:

Thanks. Thanks. Yeah, I'm really, I'm really happy with it. I'm really proud of what we do. And, um, I believe in content repurposing, I believe in content and I think that's the key. Like I said, you have to love what you're doing. I believe in it.

 

Omar:

So let's go into the nitty gritty here then. What kind of strategies do you have to repurpose content? Pretty vague question to start with.

 

Beck:

No, no, it's not. I mean, I literally have like my webinars and all that stuff are about this, so I can just say to the layout. So, um, I do like a three, a three-part system, so. Uh, it was strategy, action, and leverage. So the strategy obviously is, um, you know, what type of content. You've got your podcast, you've got your video interview, you've got your Facebook lives or whatever you do. That's your main pillar content.

 

And then there's a lot of other parts to the strategy, like, um, do you prefer to do video? Do you prefer to do whatever? And what platforms are you posting on? Not all platforms are good for all businesses, et cetera. So there's a whole pot of strategy. Then the action obviously is just, um, you know, recording things.

 

And actually this is always important and people forget, forget about it, but organizing your content into some kind of organized form because I talk to clients all the time who are like, Oh yeah, that sounds great. I need my content repurposed. And I'm like, cool. Send it, like, put it in this Google folder like that.

 

We just tell everyone to dump it into this particular folder for our organization. We have a whole thing. And people are like, Oh, Oh, I don't know where it is. I'm getting people sending me stuff on iMessage, I'm like, why do I… What? Llike I don't even, and they're sitting in a Dropbox and they've got like this thing that was years ago or months ago that they recorded and they have to know email someone to find out where it is.

I mean, it's crazy like organization. I know it's kind of like a mini ranch, but if you have, if you have all your content in one place, so much easier.

 

Omar:

So, so what do you mean by like organizing your content? Do you mean like, let's say I have a podcast. I do. And I have some Instagram photographs and have a couple of videos and stuff. How would, if I was your client, how would you like me to organize my content to pass it on to you?

 

Beck:

Well, we, like I said, we've got the Google folder. We just can dump into  two or three hours of content and we go through it and repurpose it, which I'll talk about in a second. But, but I, I keep all my content in a spreadsheet.

 

So it's like, here's a video, you know, here's a list of the videos that I've got. Here's, um, you know, the folders, different folders with different images and, um, like whatever video content that you've got. Um, and then like hip, uh, podcast interviews that I've been featured in, right? Like. I've been featured in, I don't know, 50 or a hundred podcasts. And. I have as many of them as I could find in a spreadsheet so that I can always access them if I want to repurpose them. If I want to find a logo to put on my website, if I want to show like here's some podcasts I've been on, like I can access it easily without going where the heck is that?

 

Omar:

Yeah, that makes sense. So you're not spending hours looking through folders of trying to find a specific photograph or a piece of audio, I guess.

 

Beck:

Yeah. Because people take two weeks to get us their content. I'm like, what are you doing? Like, that's insane. We've got work to do here. And you're like faffing around with… you already paid us two weeks ago and we're still waiting.

It's really frustrating. So, um, I feel like it would take a lot of the pressure off of them too. And that's a side note. Sorry.

 

Omar:

I think just, just on that note right there, I think just thinking to myself and how more organized I could be with my own content, I think a good strategy would just be to kind of simplify it into like, here's a folder for podcast. Here's a folder for photographs. Here's a folder for videos. Here's a folder for GIFs. And you're like, what I used to do was separate it by date. And then that became way too overwhelming. Because I'd have to make a new folder every day and throw some content in there. But if I just separated it by the medium, that would probably be a lot better.

 

Beck:

Yeah. That's how I do it. And listen, I'm not saying the way I do it is the best way. Like everyone has their own way, but, but I do think that a lot of the stress that we have like held in our brains, is because of the disorganization of all of our digital assets. This is probably a rant for another day, but, um, it's, it makes you feel so much more secure and confident when you know that you've got your stuff, like your shit is literally together. Right?

 

Omar:

I get it. Yeah. I think you could even stand that too. The more disorganized you are in life, period, the harder you make things for yourself, period. It probably adds more stress into your life. And that's the lesson I've started to learn quite recently as well.

 

Beck:

Yeah, definitely.

 

Well, so the, um, the actual podcast or the content repurposing, um, that happens super simple. So what we do is, um, we used to transcribe, we used to transcribe two or three hours of content and then have somebody go through and find clips and proofread those. We don't do that anymore. Um, because I think I decided it's faster and more cost effective to jump straight into the video and then find some, um, video software that is like a multi trimmer. So you can pull out, you can just like, start, stop, start, stop. you find 10 pieces of content through those videos, um, that are like one minute or less, we do one minute or less because Instagram is a minute or less. Um, and then we, we transcribe those using like rev.com or just using the person who's doing it.

 

Omar:

Like auto transcribe or person transcribe?

 

Beck:

A mix. It depends on the person doing it. Uh, but you could, you could send them to rev.com. You could use happy scribe. You could use, um, otter’s not high quality, but it's free. But we have one minute clips, so it's not that hard for somebody just to read through it and check it. Um, and then we split the audio and the video, and we take the, um, audio entering it into an audio gram, using graphics from canva that we would have previously created. Um, we have templates for all of our clients from day one. We, as soon as we get the content, we look at their branding and we get all the details and we create them little, just little like graphics and stuff like that, with their colors and their branding.

 

Um, so we do, we've got audio grams, we've got videos. Um, and the last thing or not the last thing, the next thing is quotes. So we put all the, all the good quotes that they said. It's kinda like digging for gold. We just find like these great little zingers that they said and put them on quote cards, usually with like their face or their, you know, a photo of them or something.

 

Um, and so we do a whole bunch of those. Then we write social posts, which is basically just concepts or thoughts that we had all rereading through that they're kind of like engagement or they might be medium form for Facebook or Instagram captions or stuff like that. Yeah, exactly. Um, and then we can, we don't always do this depends on the thing, but we can create GIFs, um, using any number of GIFs, websites, um, or memes.

 

Omar:

So how many pieces of content do you end up with after let's say like someone sends you an hour long video or an hour long podcast.

 

Beck:

Um, a minimum of 40 individual pieces from one hour of video.

 

Omar:

That’s amazing.

 

Beck:

Yeah. Yeah. And then we change them into three sizes each, right? So, or three sizes for three of those. Cause you can't make different sizes of the text ones. So that's 90, so it's a hundred plus any GIFs or memes or stuff like that.

 

Omar:

And then you just give it back to the client and let them post it on their own accord.

 

Beck:

Yeah, it's funny actually. Um, I was doing that for, and we still do that for some of our clients because that's what they want, but I was, I was just sending them a folder of all their, here's your content for the month.

 

And they were like, Oh crap, what am I going to do with this? And so I had a bunch of people going, Okay. Um, yeah, sure. That sounds awesome. Will you send me like an account of one of your clients? Who's been posting old content and I was like, Shit. No one is like, people aren't posting it because they're too busy and now they just have more content.

 

Omar:

Right.

 

Beck:

So I said, all right, this was maybe three months ago. I was like, okay, let's post it for them on a platform of their choice. And let's just post once a day just to make it like a flat rule. So now we have that as an option, which is we post, we create 30 pieces of content. So, um, um, 10, 10 videos, 10, um, audiograms and 10 quotes.

 

And then we also, Oh, let me do 10 social posts. And we grab photos from them for that to Instagram or whatever. Cause you have to have an image. And so we just post every day for 30 days. Um, and then the next month they give us another hour or two of content and we do the exact same thing. And so they don't need to think about it.

It's brand awareness content. And the reason that I'm so passionate about branded content is because I believe that every audience should see your, your audience, should see your face and hear your voice every single day. That's that's the the nature of nurturing an audience is for them to interact with you or see you regularly.

 

And a lot of times we, we do, we believe it when it comes to emails, Oh, you got to email your list once or twice a week or whatever, you can't leave your email list for four months. But for some reason, when it comes to content online, we don't post on LinkedIn for four months and it's like you post something and expect something to happen. It's not going to.

 

Omar:

Absolutely. And you said something key there. Showing your face, I started to realize is incredibly important as well. Uh, I run a podcast, right, obviously, uh, and I know some people who, other people that run podcasts as well. And I know other people that are YouTubers, and I know people that do a mix of both, some that, some that only write as well.

 

And I've noticed, in this day and age where attention spans are super short, where blogs aren't nearly as relevant as they used to be. The people that are getting the most success and ramping up the most, uh, traffic towards their content are the people that show their face and the people that, that talk with their voices and show their face combination of that.

 

And which is funny because some people are uncomfortable on video, right? And other people aren't comfortable with their voice. Some people just prefer writing. Any one of them could work because some are, some are going to be slower than others. Right? If you want to end up building an audience, do you want to nurture that audience in the most personal way possible? And you want to build it the fastest way possible using audio and video together with you in front of that camera? There's nothing that can beat that.

 

Beck:

A hundred percent. I agree.

 

Omar:

Cool. All right. So that, that was full of value there. And I've, you've got me thinking, I might even use your service in the future here just to like try it out and see what it ends up like. I wanted to give a small comparison.

 

So on my hunt to find social media managers online, not people, but like, things like HootSuite and a buff, buff, buffer and things like that. Right? Yeah. I found one, I forget the name of it and I don't even think they continue what they do anymore, but what they had was this interesting concept.

 

It was a social media manager where, where, where it would, where you could schedule your posts out, but it also had this bot that could take your content, written content and repurpose it into like a hundred pieces of content for you in minutes. And it was all via bot. And what it would do is like you could throw, like, I like writing so I threw like a two page article that I wrote on my LinkedIn once in there. And it took that. Took little snippets made 50 tweets out of it. Um, put random pexel like stock footage on top of some of the stuff that the bot would read, some words and think would be similar, um, and all this. And when I saw that, I'm like, yeah, that could work.

 

But what happens is that it just becomes really volume oriented and it's so impersonal and it doesn't seem like it was made by a human and that's… It makes me wonder, like what you do, if it could ever be replaced by a bot good enough to be able to do that versus, I mean, of course you have to still make the content as a person because you can't take away… A bot can't replace creativity or, um, personal content, but I wonder if there's ever going to be a bot strong enough to be able to do what you do in the way that you do it.

 

Beck:

Yeah. I've been looking into that because I'm really keen to build a piece of software, um, that does something cool. It probably wouldn't be super Epic, you know, I want to do something simple, but that makes a big difference.

 

Um, I've seen a ton of the, like, I, you can imagine how much I've spent, like checking that kind of stuff out. There are, there's a lot of stuff online that you can, that's making it easier. Um, and there's a ton of stuff that makes it automated, but you're exactly right. It doesn't pull out the best bits. It just pulls out random bits. End of the sentence, in the beginning of this, it's like what doesn't make any sense. They’re out of context. And I know from the amount of effort that we put into pulling quality, golden nuggets out of the things that people say, like it takes us hours. I pay hundreds of dollars to my team to get them to go through and find all the things.

 

Could it be done? Sure. You could just have something, some program pull out random stuff and great if that's what you want, but you're right. It's about volume. That's like amazing, we can get a thousand pieces of content. Cool. But they're just overlapping quotes from a blog post and none of them makes sense.

 

Omar:

Exactly. Yeah. And that's what I noticed too. I, once upon a time ago, I was in charge of the social media accounts for a company. And this was back when I didn't even know how Twitter worked. So what I did, I start, I just did that thing, that Instagram feature, where you post something and then it put it on Twitter for you as well at the same time.

 

And funny enough that never built up the Twitter account, because all it would do. It's… Say whatever the description was on your Instagram posts, cut that off with a dot dot dot, and then have the Instagram link, you know, and it just did that for months with no single follower added, you know, the funny thing you have to do quality content to get anybody to look at it.

 

Beck:

And it takes effort and people are always looking for a shortcut. And, uh, I think, you know, you've got to pay somebody. If you don't want to do it, it's totally fine. I don't want to do it that's why I got people to do it, but, um, you've got to pay someone to do a good job of it.

 

Omar:

Absolutely. I think so, too. So what are your future plans from here on?

 

Beck:

Well, um, we just, like I said, we've got a, uh, an Academy now that I've been focusing on, um, a lot, because a lot of times people can’t afford me to, or my team to do their content, right? They're starting out or they're, whatever, they don't have the budget for it. So. Um, I'm teaching people how to do this themselves inside the Academy. And, um, we have a bunch of stuff in there that some little tools that I made. Like I made this tool, um, a few weeks ago, that's super popular. I'm going to a Facebook group too, right now. Just like explaining it for people and presenting it. It's fun. It's um, it's uh, how to come up with a hundred content ideas in 10 minutes, but the cool thing is you can do it. We did it and listened to it. We do it in less than 10 minutes. You brainstorm a hundred ideas. There's like a kind of a method to it.

 

And then on the next page, I built this little, like a spreadsheet thingy. Well, a friend of mine did it. Let's be honest. I'm calling it a spreadsheet thingy. So, you know, I didn't do it. Um, you click on the next page and actually populates all this, all these different frameworks. And now there's 2000 pieces of content that it's just turned into with one click.

Super awesome. Um, because I find a lot of people, you know, they've got the excuse of, well, I don't know what to post on social media. And I think that, that's the type of stuff that we are really helping people within the Academy is like, Hey, now you've got ideas. How are you going to use them? What platforms are you going to use them on? What medium are you going to use?

 

Omar:

I want to add one resource here while you're on the topic of idea generation. There's a website that I use called answerthepublic.com. You've probably heard of it.

 

Beck:

Oh I have, yeah.

 

Omar:

And all you do is you put in some keywords and it creates all the Google searches around those keywords. Like, why is this? Why is that? And it gives you a ton of content ideas that I've gotten from there as well.

 

Beck:

That's super valuable. Yeah. Yeah. I love that. Um, I should put that in my resource list, actually. That's cool.

 

Omar:

Sweet. So go on with your Academy.

 

Beck:

Yeah. So, uh, the, the other, one of the other cool things in there right now is, um, we made a hundred Canva templates for authority content. One thing I talk about a lot is authority content, leadership content.

 

Omar:

Explain that, Oh, I forgot to ask you about this. This, this was really, really important to me too. Um, you said there's different types of content that we should put at different times of when, where our businesses and how new or veteran, I guess we are in that business. Could you explain that a little bit more?

 

Beck:

Yeah. Sure. So, um, when you first, when you first. I guess there's, you're going, you're taking a customer from A to B as your, every business's goal. Right? I don't know who you are to here's some money. Like that's where we're taking people. That's the journey. That's the only journey. Right?

 

And so any content that you create has to meet people where they're at. So if someone doesn't know that they, um… I'll use content re-purposing as example, if someone doesn't know that they need content, why am I, why would I pitch them content re-purposing right? So a lot of my content goes out talking about like, what is content? Why? Like what platforms do you choose? All this different type of stuff. And I really try to mix it up.

 

It's not like, it's not like every customer is at the same stage of every journey as me. And we're all moving forward at the same time or not. I'm meeting people every day who've never heard of me. Don't know why they want to, they don't know why they would want content. Wanting to grow their business. Right? So my job now is to convince them content is the way to do it. That's where I'm at there, but there's a ton of people who know who I am. Um, they have a business, they are struggling to post on social media and it's really annoying to them that they have to wake up everyday and go, damn it. What am I going to post today? And then they don't post anything. And then they beat themselves up because they haven't posted on LinkedIn in four months. Well, that's a very different type of content. Now my content is like, remember LinkedIn, like that's a whole thing we could be posting on that for you. Just let us do it.

 

It's a very different type of, uh, different type of content. And so, um, when you're meeting all these different people, I mean, I have an avatar, you know how it is like everyone wants you to describe your avatar. I've just described mine really, really well. And I know the stages that they're at. From not knowing, you know, they're just starting a business and they are like, should I set up a Facebook page or a Facebook group? Then right down to like, I hate content. I'm so sick of staring at Instagram and not knowing what to post. I know all these problems. And, and actually, this is kind of a random point, but if you're listening to this and you've heard the avatar thing a ton, you know how everyone's like, Oh, it's a woman she's in her thirties. Her name is Jel. Yeah. Well, I always thought that the ideal customer was you had to just go through the demographics like that, but it's not, and it's not. And then I thought it was psychographics, like how they see the world, which it kind of is like, we have to define how they see the world, because you're going to, it doesn't matter what age they are or what.

 

Right. But actually even further than that, it's not just an avatar. It's like a pain avatar. All of these things that you're describing for your avatar have to be about a pain that they have. All those things I just said are about pain. Because if you're talking about how they like to eat sushi on the weekend, like, what the hell are you going to do with that?

That's not useful content. So, yeah, it's all about the pains. And I thought I'd just add that in. Cause that's something I learned recently and was like, Holy crap. Yeah. Blew my mind.

 

Omar:

Cool. So that, so that's what it is then. And it's about catering to where you are in that journey. And it could literally be the same customer just at different points of that journey.

 

And if you're unknown to them, you start making introductory content, introducing yourself, how you can solve a specific beginner side problem. And then as you, as you get to know that customer a bit more, or maybe you meet people that know you, you build more content around specific parts that, uh, can help them in I guess more advanced level problems that they have.

 

Beck:

Exactly.

 

Omar:

I get what you're saying. Cool.

 

Beck:

Um, and so the, the content or the Canva templates that I was talking about earlier, they, um, are really helpful for a business owner who is new. Who's not really willing to outsource their content, but. Um, doesn't mind being on Canva and like building things, but doesn't want to spend so much time on Canva, you know, people spend hours. Oh shit. How did this take me three hours to build six graphics?

 

Omar:

Definitely.

 

Beck:

Well, yes. So now I have created all of this authority content. So things like, um, test, you know, testimonials, but a place for them to just paste a testimonial, change one color, download, I'm done. Or media features. I was featured in Forbes. Here's the thing with a little Forbes logo, done. You don't have to think about it. Um, here's the best or the three things that the three keys to success in my industry or, um, All types of business framework stuff like, yeah, there’s the Venn diagram with like the three C’s or the three P’s or whatever thing you teach, you know, the three things, um, there's all types of, there's a hundred different ones in there and we created those for that purpose to half the time that you spend creating content and all this stuff, all this stuff I built for that purpose, it's just take less time, but create better content.

 

Omar:

Hmm. Very cool idea. I'll definitely have to check that out as well, and I'll make sure to put a link to that Academy in my show notes for anybody else who's listening to this and found this as valuable as I did.

 

Beck:

Cool. Thanks.

 

Omar:

Great. So let's close this podcast off with two final questions here. Two questions that I ask nearly every guest that I have on, right.

 

So question number one. And you've been nomadic now for eight years, practically.

 

Beck:

Yep.

 

Omar:

How do you feel like your perspective of life and people has changed from the moment that you left up till now?

 

Beck:

Oh my God. I am writing a book called Reinvented. Like that's literally what it's called. And I feel like I reinvented myself every six months until now.

 

Like, I am not just a different person. It's just, you can't even compare it. It's totally opposite of a person. Um, my perspective on life is so much, I guess, broader. And I have much less fear, maybe not less fear, but I'm willing to take more action in the face of fear.

 

Omar:

Okay. Taking action. Fear I think is something that I've been pondering about quite recently as well. I've been having discussions with a really close friend of mine about how fear really is the root of literally every single problem that we face as human beings, if you weren't able to do something, or if you did something in the wrong way, or if you over-thought something or anything, it all really just stems down to fear.

 

And I think he even went, what's his name? Sigmund Freud. I think that's his name. He went Freudian on me and he told me that every, every human emotion is just based off anxiety and, uh, Yeah, he went, I don't even remember the whole argument that he gave me, but it was really, it was pretty sound. Um, but yeah, like I've, I've been thinking about fear a lot.

 

Now when it comes to like you reinventing yourself, that's so tough isn't it? Like every six months, completely different person. In a weird way, I can relate to it because when I went to go set out on my travels, I was definitely a different person when I got there than when before I left my country and then after I came back from my travels, I was a completely different person than what I was before I left.

 

And I could see that not just in myself, but the way that my friends were when I came back, they felt like they were the same people. And I just felt so different.

 

Beck:

Yeah. I totally hear that. I think I left home when I was 17. And, um, lived away from home for a year and then went home for a year and away for a year and went home for year.

 

I did that since I was 17. And then when I was 26, I left permanently. 27, um, I lived permanently. So, um, for me, I felt like that, like you just said, every time I came back after I was 17, I'd come back and be like, Nope, still not what I'm still not where I want to be. And I leave again. And so each place I would go in each time I left would transform me in a different way.

 

Um, so, and that’s since I was 17, I mean, the craziness or the transformations have been much more epic since I was away. And then we'd just move countries or start a new business, or, um, learn a new skill or things like that.

 

Omar:

It’s growth on steroids really.

 

Beck:

Yeah. It’s insane. I love it.

 

Omar:

Cool. That's a fantastic answer for that question.

 

And the second and final question is something that's great for my audience here. So you want to pay attention. If you could give one piece of advice to the audience that I have, which consists of remote workers, online entrepreneurs, digital nomads, or any sort of entrepreneurial types, to just kind of follow in your footsteps and do what you did, travel, start a business, you know, have that courage to be able to do what you did.

What piece of advice would you give them?

 

Beck:

Uh, not sure how to phrase it succinctly, but definitely what I alluded to at the beginning of this call, which was, um, it was about permission. And about following through and sticking with the thing, one thing. It doesn't, it won't be the thing. You know what I mean?

 

Like you always think, Oh, I don't want to be doing this for 50 years. What you want like, everything changes, anything that you think you're starting and how it's going to look is going to look different in two years anyway. So you just have to keep pushing forward with the thing and knowing that, um, there isn't anyone that's going to stop you except yourself.

 

So cheesy, but it's like, honestly…

 

Omar:

You’re your biggest mental roadblock.

 

Beck:

Yeah. Me thinking bigger and just going, like what help it, could this get, like, how big could I create this thing? I'm not out here to build an agency and an Academy and like make, you know, 10 grand a month or something like I am building a multi-million dollar industry, like a, an empire.

 

Omar:

That’s the spirit.

 

Beck:

Yeah. And, and I think, you know, it, no one has to do that. You don't have to do something like that, but do whatever it is that you, that scared, like that's, sounds so cheesy, but that scares you. It's scary to do that. Of course. And I'm going to fail a ton of times. I already am. I'm already failing every day at tons of different stuff.

 

But it's okay. Like I think that, that permission, you just got to grant it to yourself and let yourself do the thing that you really want to do underneath all of the fear of, fear of judgment and the people who won't believe in you and all that kind of stuff.

 

Omar:

Uh, you know, I find this commonality between digital nomads, people that live this lifestyle. And not only that, but people in general who ended up achieving things that they want to achieve. And it's the fact that they run towards their fears. I would say I would not be half the man I am today if I never ran after my fears, if instead, I just kind of stayed in my comfort zone on purpose, you know, comfort zones have their places I realized as well.

 

Uh, if you're someone who's never gotten out of their comfort zone, don't listen to this. But if you're someone that constantly thrives in fear, like I did for quite some time, I was the kind of person that lived on the edge so far that I constantly survived. Or thrived in fear. And if there wasn't a moment where I wasn't living in fear, I got super bored. Call it ADHD or whatever, but I realized there was a way to max that out too much too.

 

And sometimes you got to slip back into your comfort zone just to kind of relax and get and take it easy and take life back in its reigns. So I dunno if that's, I dunno if you can relate to that or not, but that's something that I had to deal with, in the last year or two.

 

Beck:

Yeah, I think there's, um, it doesn't always have, they're not mutually exclusive, I think.

And that's kind of a weird thing to say, but a lot of times, um, when you… I've lived in that before as well, it's kind of like survival mode when you're just constantly… it's constant and it's your, um, whatever part of the brain is like that is switched on for survival. Um, it gets difficult if you're in it for a long time, which I was, it gets difficult to unwind.

 

Omar:

That’s a good word for it.

 

Beck:

Um, Yeah. And so you do have to, you know, there was a time my, one of my coaches told me, like, just relax, you know, you don't have to, if you just, if you are happy, if you're okay with 10 grand a month or whatever your number is that you're okay with, let yourself just drift on by with that for a little while and just enjoy it.

 

You don't have to like push all the time. Like, just enjoy it for a little bit because um, at the end of the day, like the most money, the month that I made the most money ever was the month I worked the least. You know that, because that kind of it's…

 

Omar:

It's funny how that works. I've still yet to experience that, but I know it's there.

 

Beck:

And for a fact, I think I've just got a scale enough to get there. And so, like, I was just, you know, um, not working or whatever. I was actually out having fun. I was doing the things and I previously had gone, I can't go out and have fun cause I've got to do all this work, but once I let go of that, um, survival, uh, instinct (inaudible).

 

Yeah. Once I let go of that and just let myself go, you know what? It's fine. I've got enough money to pay the bills. I'm just going to, um, I'm just going to chill out and like enjoy the, and feel grateful, you know, and kind of absorb this, the good vibes. And that's been really transformative for me as well.

 

Omar:

That's good. It really reminds me of something I heard Tim Ferris say once. Said, uh, if there's a day that you just feel like you can't get any work done or you're just really overwhelming yourself and the ball just isn't rolling, take that day off and just focus on gratitude.

 

Beck:

I'd say that too. Yeah. It was like, it's like give in if you don't want to, like, why would you fight all day just so that you can get a blog post on or something like what a waste of a day, just don't do it. If you, and I say the same thing, if you need to, um, just like eat Doritos for the… on the couch for a day, if that's the thing that's gonna like…

 

Omar:

Sometimes you got to.

 

Beck:

Yeah. Do it. And don't feel guilty, embrace that, you know, here's what I'm doing.

 

Omar:

Exactly. Don’t judge yourself for it.

 

Beck:

Why like, if you're going to be guilty all day, you might as well just be sitting at a computer feeling guilty and working like that's pointless.

 

Omar:

Good, great points. That's perfect to close off on as well. Thank you so much for coming on today Beck.

 

Beck:

Thanks for having me, Omar.

 

Omar:

Absolutely.

 

Outro-

You made it to the end of the episode Nomad fam. Remember to leave a rating or review. Your feedback helps take this podcast to the next level. It's funny how things are sometimes. Your review could start a butterfly effect and literally end up changing someone else's life for the better. So keep that in mind. The guests are about to get crazy these upcoming months, including yes, Pat Flynn, sometime in January.

 

I appreciate every single one of you, the nomad fam community. It's been a great ride so far, and we're only getting started. So make sure to hit that subscribe button and stay along for the ride. One final thing. If you made it this far, I want you to shoot me an email at omarmodigital@gmail.com. I would love to sit down and connect with you with a one-on-one.

 

I want to know who you are, what you do, your story, everything about you, because if you've made it this far, you've probably been listening for a while. So, yeah, shoot me an email. Anyways, thanks for listening. Speak soon.

 

Thanks for tuning in to the nomadic executive. If you enjoyed this episode, take a moment to leave a rating or review. Your feedback helps us reach others who need a spark of inspiration. See you next time.


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